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Josiah E. Black
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Birth: 1833
Ohio, USA
Death: Dec. 21, 1903
Carthage
Jasper County
Missouri, USA

OUR FRUIT GROWERS AND GARDENERS
An Important Industry of Which But Little is Said

What Some of Them Near This City Have Done and are Doing


While telling world of the wonderful productiveness of our mines and quarries, also of our manufacturing and agricultural wealth, we are prone to neglect a very important factor of our prosperity which annually brings many thousands of dollars to this community.
The gardeners and small fruit growers of this vicinity are, as a class, intelligent and progressive, doing much in their quiet ostentatious way to make this great and wealthy country. As a result of brief visits and interviews, we [the Carthage Press] present the following:
Among those of this section Mr. J. E. Black has the honor of being the oldest in this line of business, having commenced about 1867, he having been one of the pioneers to this county at the close of the war. His tract now comprises 25 acres and occupies an elevated position just to the southeast of the city. In his line Mr. Black has been progressive, procuring and testing new varieties of vegetables and fruit and by doing so has done this county much good and gained a valuable experience.
We find his grounds nicely laid off for different vegetable, fruits, etc., and well fertilized and cared for. An acre or more set to early cabbage gives promise that he will have them in market in ten days or two weeks; tomatoes in bloom and nice beds of beets, onions, etc., all showing that as usual he desired to be the first in the market so as to secure the best prices. An acre and a half of strawberries, free from weeds and nicely mulched with straw, gives promise to yield 500 crates of choice fruit, and three and a half acres of raspberries well cared for are setting full of the young fruit. He has in one block 600 pear trees, principally the Duchess De Angonieme variety, which he has found to be the most profitable for this section. These trees are set eighteen feet apart and in the rows between he has planted two rows of raspberries, making all six feet apart, leaving room to cultivate both ways and keep the ground in good tilth.
He has had a greenhouse in which he has been quite successful, growing early vegetable plants, flowers, etc., but he is now tearing it down and contemplates expending about $3,000 in a more extensive one covering quite a tract of ground. On the north side of his garden he has a nice plot of ground set to shrubbery and ornamental trees upon which he contemplates erecting a neat and commodious residence which when completed will add much to the appearance of his place as well as to the comfort of himself and family. We know that they have earned and are entitled to all the comforts of such a home.
Taken from the Carthage Weekly Press
May 22, 1890




DEATH OF J. E. BLACK
A Well Known Citizen Succumbed to Pneumonia Yesterday Afternoon


J. E. Black, on old and highly respected citizen, died yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock after a week's illness with pneumonia.
The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock at the family home corner of Centennial and River Streets conducted by Dr. T. W. Jeffrey of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. The burial will take place in Park Cemetery.

For many years the deceased has conducted a successful vegetable and fruit farm southeast of the city and has been highly respected for his integrity and dependable business methods. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his death among whom is Rolland G. Black, assistant cashier at the Carthage National Bank.

CARTHAGE EVENING PRESS
December 22, 1903


J. E. Black was among the earlier settlers of Carthage and was about 70 years of age at the time of his death. He was one of the charter members of the Stanton Post G.A.R.

CIVIL WAR SERVICE
Private
1st Independent Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery


OVERVIEW: Organized at LaCrosse, Wis., and mustered in October 10, 1861. Moved to Camp Utley, Racine, Wis., and duty there till January 23, 1862. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., January 23, and duty there till April 3. Attached to Artillery, 7th Division, Army of the Ohio, to October, 1862. Cumberland Division, District of West Virginia, Dept. of the Ohio, to November, 1862. Artillery, 9th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Sherman's Yazoo Expedition, to January, 1863. Artillery, 9th Division, 13th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1863. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 13th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to August, 1863, and Dept. of the Gulf to August, 1863. Defences of New Orleans, La., Dept. of the Gulf, to January, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 13th Army Corps, to June, 1864. District of Morganza, Dept. of the Gulf, to August, 1864. Artillery, Cavalry Division, Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, District of Baton Rouge, La., to July, 1865
SERVICE:Cumberland Gap Campaign April 3-June 18, 1862. Occupation of Cumberland Gap June 18 to September 17. Evacuation of Cumberland Gap and retreat to Greenupsburg, Ky., and to the Ohio River September 17-October 3. Expedition to Charleston, W. Va., October 21-November 10. Ordered to Cincinnati, Ohio, November 20; thence to Memphis, Tenn., November 26. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 3 1863. Chickasaw Bayou, December 26-28. Chickasaw Bluff December 29. Expedition to Arkansas Post, Ark., January 3-10, 1863. Assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11. Moved to Young's Point, La., January, 14-23, and duty there till March 8. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., March 8. Operations from Milliken's Bend to New Carthage March 31-April 17. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson,May 1. Battle of Champion's Hill, May 16. Big Black River, May 17. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Near Clinton July 8. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Battery refitted with 30-lb. Parrott's and ordered to the Dept. of the Gulf August 13. Duty at Carrollton till September 3. Moved to Brashear City September 3-4, and to Berwick City September 24. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 30. Duty at Brashear City till December. Moved to New Orleans and duty there till April 22, 1864. Red River Campaign April-May. Moved to Alexandria April 22-28, and duty there till May 13. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. At Morganza and New Orleans till August, then moved to Baton Rouge, La. Bayou Letsworth August 11. Expedition to Clinton August 23-29. Olive Branch, Comite River and Clinton August 25. Expedition to Clinton, Greensburg and Camp Moore October 5-9. Expedition to Brookhaven, Miss., November 14-21. Liberty Creek November 15. Jackson November 21. Davidson's Expedition to Mobile & Ohio Railroad November 26-December 13. Duty at New Orleans and Baton Rouge till July, 1865. Mustered out July 18, 1865.
Battery lost during service 5 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 22 Enlisted men by disease. Total 28.
Source: Civil War Soldiers and Sailors
National Park Service


 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Fannie Harris Black (1838 - 1916)
 
 Children:
  Miss Lutie Black (1870 - 1940)*
  Frances M Black Buckingham (1881 - 1951)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Park Cemetery
Carthage
Jasper County
Missouri, USA
Plot: Traditional Section Bl 29 Lot 1 Sp 6
 
Created by: I Remember When
Record added: Feb 05, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 65206945
Josiah E. Black
Added by: I Remember When
 
Josiah E. Black
Added by: I Remember When
 
Josiah E. Black
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Janey Clark
 
 
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"Agriculture is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness." - Letter from Thomas Jefferson to George Washington (1787)
- I Remember When
 Added: Oct. 22, 2012
 
 
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