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George Henry Calvert
Birth: Jan. 2, 1803
Baltimore
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
Death: May 24, 1889
Newport
Newport County
Rhode Island, USA

Author. A direct descendant of the Calvert family who were the proprietors of what became the state of Maryland. A Harvard-educated educator and editor he was the author of many books including "Illustrations of Phrenology", "A Volume from the Life of Herbert Barclay", "Count Julian", "Cabiro", "Scenes and Thoughts in Europe", "The Battle of Lake Erie", "Joan of Arc", "The Gentleman", "Anyta and other Poems", "Arnold and André", "Goethe: his Life and Works" and "Wordsworth: A Biographic Aesthetic Study". He also contributed his work to numerous periodicals and was one of the earliest American translators of German works, having done post-graduate study at the University of Gottingen. He was briefly mayor of Newport, Rhode Island in the 1850s. (bio by: Jen Snoots) 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Elizabeth Steuart Calvert (____ - 1897)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Island Cemetery
Newport
Newport County
Rhode Island, USA
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Jen Snoots
Record added: May 25, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 19522649
George Henry Calvert
Added by: Richard Blunk
 
George Henry Calvert
Added by: Jen Snoots
 
George Henry Calvert
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Jen Snoots
 
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- Jackie Howard
 Added: Jan. 2, 2015

- Jackie Howard
 Added: Jan. 2, 2014

- Ryan D. Curtis
 Added: Jan. 2, 2014
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