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SMN James A Jordan
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Birth: 1800, Ireland
Death: Apr. 25, 1862
Pennsylvania, USA

James A Jordan, Seaman, USN, USS Pennsylvania, Mexican-American War, 1856-1857 Last Enlistment, 22 Years Service

U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006 about James A Jordan
Name: James A Jordan
Death Date: 25 Apr 1862
Cemetery: MT. Moriah Naval Plot
Cemetery Address: 62nd St & Kingsessing Ave Philadelphia, PA 19142
Buried At: Section 2 Row 3 Site 16

Pennsylvania Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-1999 about James A Jordan
Name: James A Jordan
Birth Date: 1800
Death Date: 25 Apr 1862
Age: 62
Military Branch: Navy
Veteran of Which War: Mexican-American War
Cemetery Name: Mount Moriah Cemetery
Cemetery Location: Yeadon, Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Death Certificates Index, 1803-1915 about James A Jordan
Name: James A Jordan
Birth Date: abt 1800
Birth Place: Ireland
Death Date: 25 Apr 1862
Death Place: Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Age at Death: 62
Burial Date: 26 Apr 1862
Gender: Male
Race: White
Occupation: Pensioner
Street Address: Naval Asylum
Cemetery: Naval Asylum
FHL Film Number: 1977748

USS Pennsylvania was a three-decked 140-gun ship of the line of the United States Navy, named for the state of Pennsylvania. She was the largest sailing warship ever built for the Navy, and the equivalent of a first-rate of the British Royal Navy, but her only cruise was a single trip from Delaware Bay to Chesapeake Bay.

Pennsylvania was one of the "nine ships to rate not less than 74 guns each" authorized by the US Congress on 29 April 1816. She was designed and built by Samuel Humphreys in the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Her keel was laid in September 1821, but tight budgets slowed her construction, preventing her being launched until 18 July 1837. She had three complete gun decks and a flush spar-deck and her hull was pierced for 136 guns.

Exploding shell guns were replacing solid shot by the time Pennsylvania was fitting out. A Bureau of Ordnance Gun Register for 1846 records her armament as follows:

Spar deck: two 9 pounder (4 kg) cannons and one small brass swivel.
Main deck: four 8 inch (203 mm) chambered cannons received from Norfolk in 1842, and thirty-two 32 pounder (15 kg) cannons.
Middle deck: four 8 inch chambered cannons received from Norfolk in 1842, and thirty 32 pounder cannons.
Lower deck: four 8 inch chambered cannons and 28 32 pounder cannons.

Pennsylvania shifted from her launching site to off Chester, Pennsylvania, on 29 November 1837 and was partially manned there the following day. Only 34 of her guns were noted as having been mounted on 3 December 1837. She stood downriver for New Castle, Delaware, 9 December, to receive gun carriages and other equippage before proceeding to the Norfolk Navy Yard for coppering her hull. She departed Newcastle on 20 December 1837 and discharged the Delaware pilot on the 25th. That afternoon she sailed for the Virginia Capes. She came off the Norfolk dry dock on 2 January 1838. That day her crew transferred to Columbia.

Pennsylvania remained in ordinary until 1842 when she became a receiving ship for the Norfolk Navy Yard. She remained in the yard until 20 April 1861 when she was burned to the waterline to prevent her falling into Confederate hands.

The Philadelphia Naval Asylum, later the Naval Home, was a hospital, the Philadelphia Naval School, and a home for retired sailors for the United States Navy from 1834 to 1976, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Located on over 20 acres (81,000 m2), the central building, Biddle Hall, was completed in 1833. Biddle Hall, the surgeon's residence and the governor's residence were all designed by architect William Strickland. They are considered some of the best examples of Greek Revival architecture in the United States.[by whom?] The site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971.

One of the uses of the Naval Asylum was for the Philadelphia Naval School, an academy for midshipmen that was a precursor of the United States Naval Academy. Beginning in 1838, midshipmen approaching examinations for promotion were assigned to the school for eight months of study. William Chauvenet was placed in charge of the school in 1842 and formalized much of the study. When the United States Naval Academy was formed in 1845, four of the seven faculty members came from the Philadelphia school.

The name was changed to Naval Home in 1889. In 1976, the Naval Home relocated to Gulfport, Mississippi, after it was determined that the Philadelphia facility could not be economically expanded and modernized.

The property was sold to residential developer Toll Brothers in 1988. The main building was the victim of arson in 2003. It has since been restored and designed as luxury condomiums.

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Burial:
Mount Moriah Cemetery
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: USNH Plot 2 Row 3 Grave 16
 
Created by: Rubbings
Record added: Feb 15, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 85027706
SMN James A Jordan
Added by: Rubbings
 
SMN James A Jordan
Added by: Rubbings
 
SMN James A Jordan
Added by: Rubbings
 
 
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- Rubbings
 Added: Feb. 15, 2012
 
 
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