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Roy Claxton Acuff
Birth: Sep. 15, 1903
Maynardville
Union County
Tennessee, USA
Death: Nov. 23, 1992
Nashville
Davidson County
Tennessee, USA

Country Music Singer. He is best remembered as the "King of Country Music" and is often credited with moving the genre from its early string band and "hoedown" format to the star singer-based format that helped make it internationally renowned. He was born Roy Claxton Acuff, the third of five children, into a musical family. His father was a Baptist preacher and accomplished fiddle player and his mother played the piano. During his early years, the Acuff house was a popular place for local gatherings and at these events, he would often amuse people by balancing farm tools on his chin. He also learned to play harmonica and jaw harp at a young age. In 1919 his family relocated to Fountain City (now a suburb of Knoxville), Tennessee, where he attended Central High School and sang in the school chapel's choir as well as performing in school plays. His primary passion was athletics and he was a three-sport standout at Central, and after graduating in 1925, he was offered a scholarship to Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, but turned it down. He played with several small baseball clubs around Knoxville, worked at odd jobs, and occasionally boxed. In 1929 he tried out for the Knoxville Smokies, a minor-league baseball team then affiliated with the New York (now San Francisco) Giants. After a series of collapses in spring training following a sunstroke, ended his baseball career prematurely and the effects left him ill for several years to the point where he suffered a nervous breakdown in 1930. While recovering, he took up the fiddle, often playing on the family's front porch in late afternoons after the sun went down. His father gave him several records of regionally-renowned fiddlers, such as Fiddlin' John Carson and Gid Tanner, which were important influences on his early style. In 1932 he hired on with Dr. Hauer's Medicine Show as one of its entertainers where he met legendary Appalachian banjoist Clarence Ashley, from whom he learned "The House of the Rising Sun" and "Greenback Dollar," both of which he later recorded. In 1934 he left the medicine show circuit and began playing at local shows with various musicians in the Knoxville area. That year, guitarist Jess Easterday and Hawaiian guitarist Clell Summey joined Acuff to form the Tennessee Crackerjacks, which performed regularly on Knoxville radio stations WROL and WNOX. Within a year, the group had added bassist Red Jones and changed its name to the Crazy Tennesseans. The popularity of hiss rendering of the song "The Great Speckled Bird" helped the group land a contract with the American Record Company, for whom they recorded several dozen tracks (including the band's best-known track, "Wabash Cannonball") in 1936 and 1937 before leaving over a contract dispute. In 1938 the Crazy Tennesseans relocated to Nashville, Tennessee to audition for the Grand Ole Opry and they were offered a contract. He changed the group's name to the "Smoky Mountain Boys," referring to the mountains near where he and his bandmates were raised. Shortly after the band joined the Opry, Clell Summey left the group, and was replaced by dobro player Beecher (Pete) Kirby, or "Bashful Brother Oswald." His powerful lead vocals and Kirby's dobro playing and high-pitched backing vocals gave the band its distinctive sound. By 1939, Jess Easterday had switched to bass to replace Red Jones, and Acuff had added guitarist Lonnie "Pap" Wilson and banjoist Rachel Veach to fill out the band's line-up. Within a year, Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys rivaled long-time Opry banjoist Uncle Dave Macon as the troupe's most popular act. In 1940 he and his band traveled to Hollywood, California, where they appeared in the motion picture "Grand Ole Opry." He also appeared in several subsequent B-movies, including "O, My Darling Clementine" (1943), in which he played a singing sheriff, and "Night Train to Memphis" (1946), the title of which comes from a song he recorded in 1940. In 1942 he and songwriter Fred Rose formed Acuff-Rose Publishing Company. He originally sought the company in order to publish his own music, but soon realized there was a high demand from other country artists, many of whom had been exploited by larger publishing firms. Due in large part to Rose's ASCAP connections and gifted ability as a talent scout, Acuff-Rose quickly became the most important publishing company in country music. In 1946, the company signed country singer Hank Williams, and in 1950 published their first major hit, Patti Page's rendition of "Tennessee Waltz". Later that year, he left the Grand Ole Opry after a management dispute. In 1948 he made an unsuccessful run for the governor of Tennessee on the Republican ballot. He then spent several years touring the Western United States, although demand for his appearances dwindled with the lack of national exposure and the rise of musicians such as Ernest Tubb and Eddy Arnold, who were more popular with younger audiences. He eventually returned to the Opry however, by the 1960s, his record sales had dropped off considerably. After nearly losing his life in an automobile accident outside of Sparta, Tennessee in 1965, he contemplated retiring, making only token appearances on the Opry stage and similar shows, and occasionally performing duos with long-time bandmate Bashful Brother Oswald. In 1972 his career received a brief resurgence in the folk revival movement after he appeared on the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band album, "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," paving the way for one of the defining moments of his career, which came on the night of March 16, 1974, when the Opry officially moved from the Ryman Auditorium to the Grand Ole Opry House at Opryland, Tennessee. The first show at the new venue opened with a huge projection of a late-1930s image of Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys onto a large screen above the stage. A recording from one of the band's 1939 appearances was played over the sound system, with the iconic voice of Opry founder George Hay introducing the band, followed by the band's performance of "Wabash Cannonball". In the 1980s, after the death of his wife, Mildred, he moved into a house on the Opryland grounds and continued performing. He arrived early most days at the Opry, performing odd jobs, such as stocking soda in backstage refrigerators. In 1991, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts and given a lifetime achievement award by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the first Country music artist to receive the esteemed honor. Additionally, in 1962 he became the first living inductee into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Two museums have been named in his honor, the Roy Acuff Museum at Opryland and the Roy Acuff Union Museum and Library in his hometown of Maynardville. He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 1541 Vine Street. He died of congestive heart failure in Nashville, Tennessee at the age of 89. During his musical career, he recorded a total of 43 albums (from 1949 to 1987) and 20 singles (from 1936 to 1989). (bio by: William Bjornstad) 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Neill Acuff (1877 - 1943)
  Ida Acuff (1879 - 1969)
 
 Spouse:
  Mildred Louise Douglas Acuff (1914 - 1981)*
 
 Siblings:
  Paul Briscoe Acuff (1900 - 1984)*
  Roy Claxton Acuff (1903 - 1992)
  Claude Acuff (1909 - 1971)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Spring Hill Cemetery
Nashville
Davidson County
Tennessee, USA
Plot: Hill Crest Garden
GPS (lat/lon): 36.24142, -86.72267
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Jan 01, 2001
Find A Grave Memorial# 1435
Roy Claxton Acuff
Added by: katzizkidz
 
Roy Claxton Acuff
Added by: Sue Wilden
 
Roy Claxton Acuff
Added by: Arthur Koykka
 
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- DENA ANN
 Added: Nov. 23, 2014

- LawBaby
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- Blue Lady
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