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 • Belgrade
 • City of Belgrade (Grad Beograd)
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Laza K Lazarevic
Birth: May 1, 1851
Death: Dec. 29, 1890

Author. He was a medical doctor and during his brief life published nine stories that enshrined him in Serbian literature as a writer who introduced the physiological story genre. He was often referred to as the “Serbian Turganev”. He was one of the best educated and most sophisticated people of his time, a distinguished doctor who wrote significant papers on medicine. He was also an admirer of the patriarchal tradition and its values, and in several of his stories he depicted family dramas in which the destructive forces are overwhelmed by mutual love and solidarity. He raised himself above the other authors primarily with his sense for personal psychology, his poetic vigor in conjuring up ambient and atmosphere, his carefulness in constructing the composition and style of his stories. His nine stories are almost all masterpieces - "First Matins with My Father", "The Wind", and “The People Will Honor It All". (bio by: Jelena) 
 
Burial:
Novo Groblje
Belgrade
City of Belgrade (Grad Beograd), Serbia
Plot: Parcel 8, Grave 4, Class III
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Jelena
Record added: Jan 25, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 8317459
Laza K Lazarevic
Added by: Jelena
 
Laza K Lazarevic
Added by: Jelena
 
Laza K Lazarevic
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Jelena
 
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