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Frank John Campbell
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Birth: Jul. 9, 1913
Iowa, USA
Death: Jan. 29, 2012
Clarion
Wright County
Iowa, USA




Frank J. Campbell, 98 years six months, passed away peacefully on Sunday, January 29, 2012 at CareAge of Clarion with family at his bedside.

Frank was born on July 9, 1913. He was the son of John and Mary Bruhl Campbell. He graduated from Clarion High School in 1931. He married Margaret M. Comer on September 15th, 1934. Frank worked for Anderson's Grocery and as a Clerk Carrier in the Clarion Post Office until 1940. Frank retired after 34 years of service as Fireman and Engineer on the Chicago Great Western Railroad. Frank and Margaret enjoyed their time at Eagle Lake in Minnesota.

He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Margaret in 1996, his daughter Pauline Askvig, and sons Franklin Jr. and Robert, his six siblings, great- grandson Kevin Askvig. Survivors include: eight grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and 16 great-great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews along with his CareAge family.

Frank was a member of the Fireman and the brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and the Church of Christ in Clarion.

Per his wishes Frank chose to be cremated. A memorial to Celebrate his Life will be held on Friday, February 3, 2012 at 2 p.m. at the Clarion Church of Christ. His grandchildren believe that their Grandpa would be pleased if memorials in his name were made to any animal shelter.

Published in Des Moines Register on February 1, 2012 
 
Burial:
Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown.
 
Created by: Williams
Record added: Feb 01, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 84326164
Frank John Campbell
Added by: Williams
 
 
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- Williams
 Added: Feb. 4, 2012
 
 
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