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Gen William Morris Hoge
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Birth: Jan. 13, 1894
Boonville
Cooper County
Missouri, USA
Death: Oct. 29, 1979
Missouri, USA

US Army World War I - World War II - Korea
Major Gen. William Morris Hoge
Hometown: Lexington Missouri
West Point class of 1916
Service# 0-4437
Awards: Distinguished Service Cross, Army Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Silver Star with Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters, Legion of Merit

William Hoge graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1916. Highly decorated in World War I, he directed one of the great engineering feats of World War II, the construction of the 1,519-mile ALCAN Highway in nine months. Later, in Europe, he commanded the Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group in the assault on Omaha Beach. Following service in the Korean War, he retired in 1955 as a U.S. Army General.

This biography was gleaned from https://www.westpointaog.org
William Morris Hoge was born 13 January 1894 in Booneville, Missouri, where his father was principal of Kemper Military School. At the age of eight the family moved to Lexington, Missouri, where his father became the co-owner of Wentworth Military Academy.

Bill graduated from Wentworth in 1911 as the top ranking cadet. Though not an army family, Bill and his two brothers all graduated from West Point: Ben in 1914, and Kenneth in 1920.

Graduating in a class of 125, he did not consider himself eligible for the Engineers. His blue uniforms had already been ordered with the Cavalry stripe, but he selected Engineers. His first assignment was with the 1st Engineers on the Mexican Border. He married his childhood sweetheart, Nettie Fredendall of Lexington, Missouri, on 1 May 1917. They joined the 7th Engineers at Fort Leavenworth in May, where he took command of a company. In February 1918 the regiment sailed for France. In France he was promoted to major and took command of a battalion; serving in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives. He was presented the Distinguished Service Cross by General Pershing personally.
From his own official report of 16 December 1918 the bridge construction was under direct enemy machine gun fire.

Between the wars he graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering, and graduated from Command and General Staff School with placement on the General Staff eligible list. In 1935 he moved to the Philippines to command the 14th Engineer Battalion, Philippine Scouts. During the tour in the Philippines, his battalion constructed roads and bridges on Bataan, which was then mostly impassable jungle. During this time General MacArthur was activating the Philippine Army and he requested Bill to serve as Chief of Engineers of the new force.

In February of 1942 he was assigned the mission of constructing a military road across Northwest Canada to Alaska—the ALCAN Highway. Civilian engineers in the area said it couldn’t be done in one season. He did it, using in his words, “six machines of 1,000 men each.” By September 1942. 1,030 miles of road had been cut through the virgin forest over uncharted land and convoys were moving supplies to Alaska.

After a brief time with the 9th Armored Division, he was sent to England to command the Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group which was to get assault troops ashore on Omaha Beach. His son, who saw him there wrote, “I saw him on the beach on the morning of D-1. He was surrounded by a circle of officers and noncoms. They all had problems and they all wanted decisions. By God, they were getting decisions. Someone would ask him what to do about something, he’d think for a few seconds, and then he’d tell them. That was it. No staff work, he was coordinating the whole thing in his head. It’s a good thing nothing happened to him that day, because he was sorting out the beachhead, and I don’t suppose anyone else could have done it.”

In October 1944 he returned to the 9th Armored Division and his old command, Combat Command B, (CCB). It was in this capacity that he teamed with Brigadier General Bruce Clarke in the stubborn defense of St. Vith during the Battle of the Bulge. Neither general was in command, but true soldiers that they were, they worked together, coordinating all their moves. For this action Bill Hoge was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

After withdrawing from St. Vith, his mission accomplished, his CCB was attached to General Ridgway’s XVIII Corps. Ridgway needed an experienced general officer to assist him in commanding the Corps on a 65 mile front in such a fast moving situation. He selected Bill Hoge for this important task.

In March 1945 lead elements of Bill’s CCB came upon a railway bridge over the Rhine at Remagen. The decision to sieze that bridge required great moral courage. His assigned mission was to sweep the west bank of the Rhine clear of Germans. The Rhine is a formidable obstacle at Remagen with sleep rocky hills rising from its banks. The bridge had been prepared for demolition and the Germans had a Flak Battalion on the mountain just downstream from the bridge. Bill Hoge did not have time to go all the way back for a change of orders. He got General Leonard’s (Commanding General, 9th Armored Division) approval and sent his infantry across. It was a dangerous gamble; failure or even success could have lost him his command. For his audacity at Remagen, Bill Hoge was awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to the Distinguished Service Medal.
After the bridgehead was consolidated on 21 March, he was given command of the 4th Armored Division and on 2 May promoted to major general.

After World War II he commanded the Engineer Center at Fort Belvoir and later was commanding general of United States troops in Trieste. In March 1951 the commanding general IX Corps in Korea was killed. General Ridgway as Commanding General Eighth Army asked Department of the Army for one of three generals as a replacement.

Following retirement, he and his wife Nettie returned to their childhood home in Lexington, Missouri. But Bill Hoge was not ready to sit back; so in February 1957 he was appointed Chairman of the Board for Interlake Iron Company in Cleveland. He remained with the company for ten years as chairman and consultant. His wife Nettie died in July 1959. Her death was a blow from which he never completely recovered.

Finally, his health failing, he moved in October 1975 to be with his son on his farm in Kansas. He died suddenly on 29 October 1979.

CITATION
Distinguished Service Cross
Awarded for actions during the World War I

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Major (Corps of Engineers) William Morris Hoge, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with 7th Engineers, 5th Division, A.E.F., near Brieulles, France, 4 November 1918. After personally and voluntarily reconnoitering the site of a pontoon bridge over the Meuse, in daylight and under direct shell fire, Major Hoge commanded the movement of a train of heavy wagons, under enemy observation, to this location. Major Hoge then supervised the construction of the bridge and the successful crossing of the train.
General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 37 (1919)
Action Date: November 4, 1918
Service: Army Rank: Major
Regiment: 7th Engineers
Division: 5th Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Army Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Major General William Morris Hoge, United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Commanding General, 4th Armored Division, during the period 28 February to 9 March 1945.
General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 43 (May 30, 1945)
Action Date: February 28 - March 9, 1945
Service: Army
Rank: Major General Company: Commanding General
Division: 4th Armored Division

Army Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded for actions during the Korean War

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Lieutenant General William Morris Hoge, United States Army, was awarded a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility.
General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 82 (May 30, 1946)
Action Date: 1945
Service: Army
Rank: Lieutenant General Company: Commanding General
Division: 4th Armored Division

Army Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal to General William Morris Hoge (ASN: 0-4437), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Commanding General, IX Corps, in Korea, from 5 March 1951 to 23 December 1951.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 28 (March 13, 1952)
Action Date: March 5 - December 23, 1951
Service: Army
Rank: General Company: Commanding General
Division: IX Corps

Silver Star
Awarded for actions during the World War I

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Major (Corps of Engineers) William Morris Hoge, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action while serving with the 7th Engineers, 5th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, in France, during World War I.
Service: Army Rank: Major
Regiment: 7th Engineers Division: 5th Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Silver Star
Awarded for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: William Morris Hoge, United States Army, was awarded a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Commanding General, 4th Armored Division, during World War II.
Action Date: World War II
Service: Army Rank: Major General Company:
Commanding General Division: 4th Armored Division

Silver Star
Awarded for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Major General William Morris Hoge, United States Army, was awarded a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Commanding General, 4th Armored Division, during World War II.
Action Date: World War II
Service: Army Rank: Major General
Company: Commanding General Division: 4th Armored Division

Legion of Merit
Awarded for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Major General William Morris Hoge, United States Army, was awarded the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as Commanding General, 4th Armored Division, during World War II.
Action Date: 1944 - 1945
Service: Army Major General
Company: Commanding General Division: 4th Armored Division
 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  William McGuffey Hoge (1856 - 1938)
  Annette Fiery Hoge (1866 - 1956)
 
 Spouse:
  Nettie Fredendall Hoge (1894 - 1959)
 
 Children:
  William Morris Hoge (1918 - 2000)*
  George Fredendall Hoge (1925 - 2010)*
 
 Siblings:
  Mary Hazel Hoge Chew (1889 - 1956)*
  Benjamin Fiery Hoge (1891 - 1985)*
  William Morris Hoge (1894 - 1979)
  Kenneth G. Hoge (1899 - 1972)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Section 2 Lot 3405
 
Maintained by: John Dowdy
Originally Created by: Russ Jacobs
Record added: May 20, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 52641194
Gen William Morris Hoge
Added by: Mike Serpa
 
Gen William Morris Hoge
Added by: David McInturff
 
Gen William Morris Hoge
Added by: David McInturff
 
 
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Remembering you on this Memorial DayWeekend 2016
- Lazer
 Added: May. 28, 2016
Hoge directed one of the great engineering feats of World War II, the construction of the 1,519-mile (2,450 km) ALCAN Highway in nine months. Later, in Europe, he commanded the Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group in the assault on Omaha Beach. He t...(Read more)
- R. E. Wood
 Added: Dec. 29, 2013
RIP
- gordonphilbin
 Added: Aug. 24, 2013
 
 
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