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Find all Abells in:
 • Holy Name of Mary Cemetery
 • Calvary
 • Marion County
 • Kentucky
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Mary Elizabeth A. "Eliza" Raley Abell
Birth: 1809
Washington County
Kentucky, USA
Death: Mar. 2, 1851
Calvary
Marion County
Kentucky, USA

Parents: Henry Sylvester Raley, Jr. and Mary Stone.

1st Wife of James Abell.
Marriage Bond posted by Cornelius Raley. Evidently, bond was posted on 10-27-1828.
Married at Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church. Washington County, Ky Marriage Records, Bk 2-126. Marriage date shown as 10-27-1828. Holy Name of Mary records show 11-04-1828 as marriage date.

Baptized, 6-4-1810, at Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church. Sponsors, Joseph Spalding and Dorothy Raley.
On the 1850 Marion County, Ky Census, she is listed as Eliza Abell, a 40 year old, Ky native, living with her husband, James Abell, and children, Elizabeth E., Neely, Mary, Emily J., James B., Henry, Jefferson and Harriet E. Abell.

*Buried in the old Holy Name of Mary Cemetery, Calvary, KY. 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  James Abell (1809 - 1876)*
 
 Children:
  Mary Elizabeth Abell Mattingly (1829 - 1895)*
  Cornelius G Abell (1832 - 1909)*
  Emma Jane Abell Caldwell (1837 - 1881)*
  Henry Abell (1841 - 1917)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Holy Name of Mary Cemetery
Calvary
Marion County
Kentucky, USA
 
Created by: Dolores & Danny Bohn
Record added: Mar 18, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 67094277
Mary Elizabeth A. Eliza <i>Raley</i> Abell
Cemetery Photo
Added by: RhondaPattonWathen & children
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.

3rd great-grandmother, rest in peace.
- Kelly
 Added: Feb. 17, 2016

- Lillie Riney
 Added: Mar. 9, 2015

- Charlotte McConaha
 Added: Jan. 30, 2015
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