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Homer Lusk Collyer
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Birth: Nov. 6, 1881
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA
Death: Mar. 22, 1947
Harlem
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA

Homer Lusk Collyer (1881-1947) Lawyer; Recluse and Hoarder (b. November 06, 1881, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA - d. March 22, 1947, 2078 Fifth Avenue at corner of 128th Street, Harlem, New York City, New York, USA)

Birth:
He was the brother of Langley Collyer (1885-1947), both lived together in the family home as recluses. Both are sons of Herman Livingston Collyer (1857-1923) a physician, and Susie Gage Frost (1856-1929) an opera singer. Their other sibling was: Susan Collyer (1880) who died as an infant and appears in the 1880 US Census.

Parents:
Herman and Susie were first cousins and appear in the 1880 US Census where Herman was attending medical school.

Manhattan:
Homer was listed as a lawyer in the 1910 Census and Langley as a student. Herman Livingston Collyer, their father, had his medical office at 153 West 77th Street in Manhattan.

Recluses:
Together Homer and Langley are known as the Collyer brothers. They lived as recluses and were packrats in Harlem, in Manhattan, New York. They are the textbook example of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). They lived in a four-story brownstone at 2078 Fifth Avenue at the corner of 128th Street. Homer Collyer was blind and bedridden and he lived with his younger brother, Langley, who cared for, and fed him. They amassed a collection of discarded items that they hoarded in their home. The family moved to Harlem in 1909-1910, from Murray Hill when Harlem was the fashionable suburb of Manhattan. Homer was a member of Phi Beta Kappa at Columbia University, where he earned his degree in admiralty law. Langley graduated from Columbia with a degree in mechanical engineering and chemistry, but never took a job. Around 1928, Homer worked for John R. McMullen, and attorney, who later became the family legal advisor. Homer later worked for City Title Insurance doing research in the New York City Hall of Records. The two sons became more and more reclusive after their parents died. 180 tons of material had to be removed from the building after their death, including 10 grand pianos and a model T Ford. Homer died on March 22, 1947, of starvation, after Langley had set off one of his own booby traps that fatally buried him in a pile of debris. It took 18 days to find Langley's body.

Burial:
The family is buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery in Brooklyn. The family appears in the 1900 and 1910 US Census living in Manhattan at 109 East 54th Street.

References:
Their story is told in the book "Ghosty Men: The Strange but True Story of the Collyer Brothers, New York's Greatest Hoarders, An Urban Historical" by Franz Lidz. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Herman Truman Livingston Collyer (1857 - 1923)
  Susan Gage Frost Collyer (1852 - 1929)
 
 Siblings:
  Susan Frost Collyer (1880 - 1880)*
  Homer Lusk Collyer (1881 - 1947)
  Langley Collyer (1885 - 1947)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Cypress Hills Cemetery
Brooklyn
Kings County (Brooklyn)
New York, USA
 
Created by: Richard Arthur Norton (1...
Record added: Oct 27, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 8034842
Homer Lusk Collyer
Added by: Richard Arthur Norton (1958- )
 
Homer Lusk Collyer
Added by: Richard Arthur Norton (1958- )
 
Homer Lusk Collyer
Added by: Zouave
 
 
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- ljhughes
 Added: Jul. 7, 2014
Some say Both you, Homer & Your Brother , Langley had Such Peculiar Notions as Recluses, BUT NOW MAY YOU REST IN PEACE & Your Dearest Wish Come True Each & Every Day Hereafter & You Both Be Content Evermore.
- JOE HIX
 Added: May. 31, 2013
Homer, we hardly knew ye.
-Anonymous
 Added: Apr. 5, 2013
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