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Sallie Mae Smith Caires
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Birth: Jan. 27, 1944
Wailuku
Maui County
Hawaii, USA
Death: Mar. 30, 2012
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Sallie Mae Caires (Smith), of Maui, died March 30th, 2012 at her home in Houston, Texas where she has resided for the past year.
Sallie Mae was born January 27th, 1944, in Wailuku, Maui to Louise (Worley) and William Owen Smith.
She attended Kaunoa School and then Baldwin High School and lived on Maui most of her life. She had an amazing knowledge of the island, its history and its people. Her ability to show compassion and love was one of her greatest gifts.
She is survived by her mother, Louise Smith of Kula; her sister Carol Oliver (Smith) of Idaho; her sons, William (Jeanette) and Michael (Jennifer) Caires of Colorado, Joy (Lona) Caires of Minnesota and Sara Caires of Maui; her six grandchildren, Justin, Austin, Hailee, Mikaela, Trevor James and Henry; and her great granddaughter, Alice Leann.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Gordon Henry Caires of Makawao.
A celebration of her life will be held on Maui at a later date, to be announced.



Published in Houston Chronicle on April 8, 2012 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  William O Smith (1916 - 1979)
 
 Spouse:
  Gordon Henry Caires (1942 - 1995)
 
Burial:
Maui Veterans Cemetery
Makawao
Maui County
Hawaii, USA
 
Created by: Joel Farringer
Record added: Apr 08, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 88249759
Sallie Mae <i>Smith</i> Caires
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Trish & Kameha
 
 
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Resting in Peace in da Lord's Garden. God Bless America & da `Ohana.
- Freitas-Caires `Ohana
 Added: Mar. 19, 2013
 
 
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