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Harley Mowrey, Sr
Birth: Aug. 9, 1822
Providence County
Rhode Island, USA
Death: Oct. 20, 1920
Vernal
Uintah County
Utah, USA

HISTORY OF HARLEY MOWREY
PIONEER OF 1847
Written by his daughter
Harriet A. Mowrey Dingman

Harley Mowrey, Senior, son of Barton Mowrey and Ruth Walkup (Walker), was born in Burrville, a small town about fifteen miles from Providence, R.I., Aug. 9, 1822.

When he was about 14 years of age, he climbed a tree in quest of a squirrel. A branch broke and he fell to the ground and was left for dead by his boy companion. However, marvelous as it may seem, not one bone was broken and he regained consciousness in time to meet a small army of neighbors who were on their way to hold an inquest over his body. They went to the scene of the accident and measured the distance he fell -- it was over 50 feet.

On another occasion, Harley was kicked by a vicious horse over the left eye. The toe calk was buried in his flesh and he was thrown over a rod by the force of the impact of the horse's foot.

Harley's early life was spent in pursuit of the trade of stone and brick mason. When he was 17 years of age, he came in contact with the Latter Day Saint Church; became a convert to their faith; and was baptized January 1839. A hole was cut in the ice for the purpose of baptizing him. Soon after, Harley went to Nauvoo, Ill. His parents did not become converts until years later, but were finally baptized, joined the church, and went around Cape Horn to San Francisco in the ship Brooklyn during the year 1846.

During his residence in Nauvoo, most of my father's time was spent working in the temple. He lived across the street fromt he residence of the prophet, Joseph Smith. Harley was on the most intimate terms with Mr. Smith and his family, and occasionally, Harley was in their employ. On one occasion, Joseph Smith and Erastus Snow exhibited to Harley the Egyptian mummies, as well as the roll of papyrus and inscriptions of which a portion of the "Pearl of Great Price" was translated. Harley was also present at the transfiguration when the mantle of leadership fell upon Brigham Young.

In April 1844, Harley was called on a mission to New Hampshire. His companion was Elder David Cluff, the father of Professor Benjamin Cluff of Provo, Utah. The mission lasted only six months, as Harley was released soon after the death of Joseph Smith. Upon Harley's return to Nauvoo, his whole time was spent working on the temple, as strenous efforts were being made for the its completion. (Harley related to his children many times that his food at that time consisted of cornmeal mush and molasses).

When mobs began to gather about the city, Harley assisted in defending the Nauvoo and gathering other Mormons from outside settlements. At this time many were killed and many homes were burned. Harley also assisted in building wagons in preparation for the great exodus west. He was a member of the artillery company, the first to leave Nauvoo for the march into the wilds of western America to seek asylum beyond the reach of mob violence and religious intolerance. The company crossed the Mississippi River on ice Feb. 9, 1846 and camped on Sugar Creek, ten miles distant, without tents, in 15 inches of snow. They subsisted several weeks on meal and parched corn and dried pumpkin. The hardships endured by this company were so severe that many refused to endure them any longer and returned to Illionois, leaving the Mormon church and gave up the struggle. Of the original 50, only 15 of the company reached the Missouri River at Council Bluffs.

Here the company put up 100 tons of hay for Mr. Surpee, the Indian Agent, receiving supplies in payment. While at the Bluffs, the company was overtaken by Colonel Allen, a U.S. army officer, with a requisition for 500 men to serve in the Mexican War. My father volunteered and was mustered into the famous Mormon Battalion gathered at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, July 11, 1846. Harley was to serve one year. About nine families of saints joined in with the Battalion and accompanied them on the march. Among them was Norman Sharp and wife. Mr. Sharp became a member of the Battalion. It was the purpose of these families to got to California and settle there. However, upon reaching the Arkansas River, the commanding officer decided it would be impossible for the families to cross the mountains with the troops, so they were sent to Pueblo, Colorado. At Pueblo, there were a few settlers of whites at that early date. Four members of the Battalion, including my father, were detailed under Captain Higgins to take these families to Pueblo, then overtake and join the company at Santa Fe, New Mexico.

On the march to Pueblo, Norman Sharp was accidently shot and afterward died. When the families had been located at Pueblo, and the detail had reache Santa Fe, the Battalion had been gone ten days, as nothing could be done but remain there. Soon after, another detail arrived under Captain Brawn, with many sick. Their orders were to proceed to Pueblo and remain until spring. Father said he hunted deer and buffalo all over the base of Pike's Peak during that winter. The following spring, they marched onward, Captain Brawn leading them northward into what is now the state of Wyoming.

They found the trail of the pioneers under Brigham Young and followed it. The hardships of the march and the distressing experiences through which they passed could not surpass the love for our Nation's natal day, July 4, 1847. My father and mother, Martha Jane Sargent Sharp, were united in marriage by Elder Dimmick B. Huntington at Independence Rock.

The time of the enlistment expired on July 16th, so they were honorably discharged by Captain Brawn. The company reached Salt Lake valley on July 27, 1847 -- just three days after the first pioneers. Father suffered untold hardships on this journey.

The next event of importance happened in 1850 when called with Charles C. Rich and Amasa Lyman to go to California. The hardships of this tedious journey are well known. Arriving in San Francisco, Harley joined his parents, Barton Mowrey and Ruth Walkup (Walker) and remained there two years. After leaving, Harley moved to San Bernardino, Calif., where my Uncle, Charles Rich, was with his family. They spent five years there, until being recalled with the advent of Johnson's Army in Utah. Harley's mother came with him and finally died in Kaysville, Utah.

At the time of the move south in 1858, my parents spent a winter in Beaver City, Utah. After this, they lived in Centerville, Davis Co., until the autumn of 1864, when our family was called to accompany Charles Rich to settle Bear Lake Valley, Idaho. Harley made his home at what is now Paris. When he returned from California he brought with him a combined reaper and mower. It was the very first mower ever brought to Utah. It cost $400 in San Francisco and the freight on it from there to Utah was $40. When Harley went to Idaho, he took the machine with him. He was the first to enjoy the distinction of introducing the machine into both Utah and Idaho.

When Bear Lake was organized, Harley was made a member of the first High Council of the Bear Lake Stake, a position he held until the family moved to Vernal in 1885. At the organization of the Uinta Stake of Zion in 1887, Harley was again made a High Counselor, a position he held until honorably released because of his advanced age.

Father was a life-long pioneer. He crossed the Continent before a track across the Rockies was made. It was his privilege over a half an age ago to gaze upon the rolling waves of two oceans, and he has figured conspicuously in the founding of may new settlements. He has done his part in blazing the trail for civilization. After being driven from his home in Nauvoo, he responded to the call of Uncle Sam for volunteers to serve in the Mexican War, and has carried a musket in his country's defense for many a weary mile over trackless plains and mountains. Having spent most of his life on the rugged edge of civilization, we do not hesitate to say that the State and the Nation owe him a debt of gratitude.

Harley's ancestors were among the early settlers of America. On his father's side, he is of the old Puritan stock. HIs mother was of Welsh extraction. His grandfather was the one who purchased the sight of the great city of Providence, R.I. from the Indians.

When my father gave this sketch, he was 84 years old, hale and hearty, bright and sharp in intellect. He furnished all the data for this article without referring to books of any kind. HIs memory of dates and succession of events is remarkable. Father was a man of sterling integrity, whose word was as good as his bond, and if he ever had an enemy on earth, he did not know of it. He was the most loving and patient father, a kind and affectionate husband. His trials were many, but he bore them all patiently. His life was an exemplary one, and he was loved by all who knew him. He lived and died faithful to all principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Father lived to the age of 98 and passed away Oct. 20, 1920, just two months prior to my mother's death the same year, Dec. 19, 1920. They were laid side-by-side in Vernal cemetery to await the resurrection of the just.

It is needlesss to relate the hardships incident to the early settlement of Salt Lake Valley. My parents participated in all of the them, living on roots dug from the earth by my mother and her three children.

At one time, Father was going up Creek City Canyon for wood and one of his oxen fell off a bridge and broke its neck (his best oxen, in the best condition), but no sooner had it fallen than help came and soon cut the oxen's throatg, and it was then cut up and divided for all the families. Every bit of it was eaten except the hoofs and horns; the hide was scraped and boiled and made into soap. No one ever starved to death at these times -- the Lord was watching over them.

At one time, Father planted one-half bushel of wheat and saw it eaten off three times by the grasshoppers until the field was as bare as the road; and still he kept watering the ground and never giving up the struggle until he realized 10 bushels of wheat from that ground.

_____________________________________

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
21 October 1920

LAST BATTALION SURVIVOR DIES - PIONEER OF 98 YEARS IS CALLED

HARLEY MOWREY, SR., last survivor of the famous Mormon Battalion, who died at Vernal yesterday.

Veteran of Frontier Hardships Is Survived by Host of Descendants

Special to the Tribune
VERNAL, Oct. 20 - Harley Mowrey, Sr., 98 years of age, last survivor of the famous Mormon Battalion, died at his home in this city at an early hour this morning, after an illness of about two months. Infirmities incident to age were the cause of death. Mr. Mowrey was made a member of the high council and held that position until he was removed to this city in 1885. He also was a high councilor of Uintah stake for many years.

SURVIVORS MANY

Mr. Mowrey enjoyed the distinction of bringing the first combined reaper and mower into Utah, the purchase being made in San Francisco.

In addition to his aged widow, Mr. Mowrey is survived by seven children, forty-one grandchildren, ninety-four great grandchildren and thirty great, great grandchildren. The children and their ages and places of residence are as follows: Sarah Ellen Thomas, 74, Vernal; Harley M. Mowrey, Jr., 69, Salt Lake; Mrs. Ole Hansen, 64, Pocatello, Idaho; Mrs. Harriet Dingham, 62, San Francisco, Calif.; Mrs. Ella Dingham, 60, Provo; Charles Barton Mowrey, 56, Idaho; Uriah Mowrey, 52, Vernal.

Harley Mowrey had an interesting career. He was born at Burrillville, near Providence, R.I., August 9, 1822. His great-grandfather purchased the site of Providence from the Indians. At the age of 14 years, Mr. Mowrey met with an accident which might easily have cost him his life, but he escaped serious injury. He had climbed a tree in an effor to catch a squirrel and when on a limb fifty-five feet above ground, the limb broke and he fell th entire distance to the ground.

NARROWLY ESCAPES DEATH

Word went out that he had been killed and neighbors hastened to the scene to take the body home. Upon their arrival, however, the lad regained consciousness, which had been lost in the fall, and appeared none the worse for his experience.

When 17 years of age, Mr. Mowrey became a convert to the L.D.S. church, and shortly after went to Nauvoo, where he spent the greater part of his time working upon the temple. His home was directly across the street from that of Prophet Joseph Smith and he was on intimate terms with the prophet.

After serving six months as a missionary in New Hampshire, Mr. Mowrey returned to Nauvoo. He was a member of the artiliery company and left Nauvoo with the saints when they began their exodus to the west in February 1846.

ENLISTS IN THE BATTALION

In July 1846, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Mowrey enlisted in the Mormon Battalion and went with the battalion to Santa Fe, N.M., returing to Pueblo, Colo., with a sick detachment and spending the winter of 1846-47 in the Colorado city.

In the spring of 1847, the march to Salt Lake was resumed and Mr. Mowrey and other members of the battalion arrived in the city July 29, five days after President Brigham Young and his band of pioneers had entered the valley.

On the way to Salt Lake, July 4, 1847, at Independence Rock in Wyoming, Mr. Mowrey was united in marraige to Martha Jane Sharp, widow of Norman Sharp, also a member of the battalion, who died from a gunsot wound, accidentally inflicted by himself, while on the march to Santa Fe. Mrs. Sharp also returned to Pueblo with the sick detachment, and it was here that a daugther, Sarah Ellen Sharp, was born. This daughter, now the widow of Marion C. Thomas, always looked upon Mr. Mowrey as her father for several years and she cared for her stepfather and mother for many years.

MUSTERED OUT

Upon his arrival in Salt Lake, Mr. Mowrey was mustered out of service and in 1850 accompanied Apostle Charles C. Rich and Amasa Lyman to California, where he joined his parents at San Francisco and remained for two years. Later he removed to San Bernardino and remained until called back to Utah by the advent of Johnston's army.

After his return to Utah, Mr. Mowrey resided for a time at Centerville but ... (here the obituary ends, with the copy failing to capture the entire obituary).

____________________________________

Harley Mowrey, Sr., the last survivor of the Mormon Battalion, passed away at his home in Vernal, Oct. 20, at the ripe age of 98 years. He was born at Burrillville, near Providence, R. I., August 9, 1822. His great-grandfather purchased the site of Providence from the Indians. At the age of 14 years, Mr. Mowrey met with an accident which might easily have cost him his life. He had climbed a tree and when on a limb fifty-five feet above ground the limb broke and he fell the entire distance to the ground. Word went out that he had been killed and neighbors hastened to the scene, but the lad regained consciousness, and appeared none the worse for his experience.

When 17 years of age Mr. Mowrey joined the Church, and shortly after went to Nauvoo, where he spent the greater part of his time working upon the temple. His home was directly across the street from that of the Prophet Joseph Smith. After serving six months as a missionary in New Hampshire, Mr. Mowrey returned to Nauvoo. He was a member of the artillery company and left Nauvoo with the Saints when they began their exodus to the west in February, 1846.

In July, 1846, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Mowrey enlisted in the Mormon battalion and went with the battalion to Santa Fe, N. M., returning to Pueblo, Colo., with a sick detachment and spending the winter of 1846-47 in the Colorado city. In the spring of 1847 the march to Salt Lake was resumed, and Mr. Mowrey and other members of the battalion arrived in this city, July 29, five days after President Brigham Young and his band of pioneers had entered the valley.

On the way to Salt Lake, July 4, 1847, at Independence Rock, in Wyoming, Mr. Mowrey married Martha Jane Sharp, widow of Norman Sharp, also a member of the battalion, who died from a gunshot wound, accidently inflicted by himself, while on the march to Santa Fe. Mrs. Sharp also returned to Pueblo with the sick detachment, and it was here that a daughter, Sarah Ellen Sharp, was born. This daughter, now the widow of Marion C. Thoms, always looked upon Mr. Mowrey as her father, and for several years she has cared for her stepfather and her mother.

Upon his arrival in Salt Lake, Mr. Mowrey was mustered out of service, and in 1850 accompanied Elders C. C. Rich and Amasa Lyman to California, where he joined his parents at San Francisco and remained for two years. Later he removed to San Bernardino and remained until called back to Utah by the advent of Johnston's army.

After his return to Utah Mr. Mowrey resided for a time at Centerville, but in 1864 was called to accompany Elder Rich and aid in the settlement of Bear Lake valley, Idaho. His home at that time was in what is now known as Paris. When Bear Lake stake was organized Mr. Mowrey was made a member of the high council and held that position until he removed to this city in 1885. He also was a high councilor of Uintah stake for many years. In addition to his aged widow, Mr. Mowrey is survided by seven children, forty-one grandchildren, ninety-four great-grandchildren and thirty great-great-grandchildren.

_____________________________________

LATTER-DAY SAINT BIOGRAPHICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA
VOLUME 4
MISCELLANEOUS BIOGRAPHIES
MOYES, RALPH E.

Mowrey, Harley, a member of the Mormon Batallion, Company C, was born August 19, 1822, in Rhode Island, a son of Barton Mowrey and Ruth Walkup. He became a convert to "Mormonism" at an early day and came west during the general exodus from Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1846. He enlisted in the Mormon Batallion in July, 1846, was sent with the sick detachment from Sante Fe, to Pueblo and came to the "Valley" July 29, 1847. On the journey (on July 4, 1847) he married Martha Jane Sharp, the widow of Norman Sharp, a member of the Batallion, who died in September 1846. She bore her second husband (Mowrey) nine children, having a daughter (Sarah Ellen) by her first husband. Bro. Mowrey was a stone-mason by avocation, and lived in different places. The last few years of his life he spent at Vernal, where he died October 21, 1920, aged 98 years.

_____________________________________

TREASURES OF PIONEER HISTORY
TREASURES OF PIONEER HISTORY: VOL. 4
STORIES OF THE MORMON BATTALION
HARLEY MOWREY


Harley Mowrey, Sr., was born in Burrsville near Providence, Rhode Island, August 9, 1822. When he was seventeen years of age he came in contact with the Latter-day Saint missionaries, became a convert to their faith and was baptized in January 1839. While at Council Bluffs, Harley enlisted in the Mormon Battalion in Company "C." On reaching the Arkansas River the commanding officer decided it would be impossible for the sick men, some accompanied by their wives and children, to go to California, so they were detached and sent to Pueblo for the winter. Harley was detailed to help them to their destination. Among this company of Battalion boys was one Norman Sharp who was accompanied by his wife, Martha Jane. On the march to Pueblo, Norman was accidently shot and soon after died in September of 1846.

On the march toward Salt Lake Valley the following summer, Harley Mowrey and Martha Jane, widow of Norman Sharp, were united in marriage at Indpendence Rock, Wyoming, July 4, 1847. They reached Salt Lake Valley a few days after the original band of Pioneers under Brigham Young. In 1850 Harley was called to the San Bernardino mission under the leadership of Amasa Lyman and C.C. Rich. He remained there until 1857 when he was called back to Utah at the time of the Johnston Army episode.

Part of his later life ws spent in Bear Lake Valley, then he moved to Vernal in 1885. He lived to the age of ninety-eight years, passing away on October 20, 1920, the last surviving member of the famed Mormon Battalion. He is buried in the Vernal cemetery beside his wife who passed away two months later - D.U.P Files.
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TREASURES OF PIONEER HISTORY: VOL. 6
MONUMENTS ERECTED BY D.U.P.
UINTAH STAKE TITHING OFFICE - NO. 189

One of the requirements of the Latter-day Saints Church is that each member shall give ten percent of his annual income to the Church which is used for expenses of the Church such as caring for the needy, supporting Church schools, missionary work, and maintaining other Church offices. Hence, in nearly every town or settlement a building was erected to receive the tithes of their members, which, in pioneer times, was paid in kind. The builders were HARLEY MOWREY who had worked three years on the Nauvoo Temple in Illinois and John Jacob Slough, and experienced rock mason from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Such was the purpose of this first tithing office in Uintah Stake that now has become the Relic Hall of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneerss. It houses many of the treasured belongings of the first settlers in that region, which was settled in 1877, and called Ashley Center, located on Ashley Fork of Green River. This historic pioneer building and its precious belongings, re-dedicated in September 1953, stands as a reminder of the sacrifices made by "the first settlers of that community."

Residency Data: Paris, Rich, Utah; 1870 - In 1870, Harley had a household of nine, a real wealth of $600, and a personal wealth of $600 - Utah Federal Census; Year 1870
_____________________________________

REFERENCE: PIONEERS & PROMINENT MEN OF UTAH. FRANK ESSHOM. 1913. Page 1048

Vocation Data: Stone Mason, 1870 - Utah Federal Consensus; Year 1870; Stone & Brick Mason -
Harley came to Utah July 27, 1847, with Capt. James Brown contingent of the Mormon Battalion. He was a member of the first high council of the Bear Lake Stake and later of Uintah Stake. He served a mission in New Hampshire in 1844. He worked on the Nauvoo Temple. He was a member of the first artillery company that left Nauvoo Feb. 9, 1846; mustered into Company C of the Mormon Battalion on July 6, 1846. He accompanied C.C. Rich and Amasa M. Lyman to California, residing there three years. He took part in the move south, after which he lived at Centerville until 1864. He was called to assist in settling Bear Lake Valley, Idaho. He moved to Vernal, Utah, in 1855.
_____________________________________

LDS BIOGRAPHICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA. ANDREW JENSEN. 1951, VOL 4, PAGE 755

Harley was a member of the Mormon Battalion, Company C. He became coverted to Mormonism at an early age and came west during the general exodus from Nauvoo, Illinois in 1846. He enlisted in the Mormon Battalion in July 1846, was sent with the sick detachment from Santa Fe, to Pueblo and came to the "Valley" July 29, 1847. On the journey (on July 4, 1847) he married Martha Jane Sharp, the widow of Norman Sharp, a member of the Battalion, who died in September 1846. She bore her second husband (Mowrey) nine children, having a daughter (Sarah Ellen) by her first husband. Bro. Mowrey was a stone-mason by avocation, and lived in different places. The last few years of his life he spent in Vernal, where he died October 21, 1920, age 98 years.
_____________________________________

SOURCE UNKNOWN:

Mowrey, Harley (son of Barton Mowrey, Providence, R.I.) Born Aug 9, 1822, Burrillville, near Providence, R.I. Came to Utah July 27, 1947, with Capt. James Brown, contingent Mormon Battalion.

Married Martha Jane Sargent (Sharp), widow of Norman Sharp, who was accidentally shot during the Battalion's march to Pueblo.

Member first high council of Bear Lake stake and later Uinta stake; missionary in New Hampshire 1844. Worked on Nauvoo Temple. Member, first artillery company that left Nauvoo, Feb. 9, 1846; mustered into Co. C Morman Battalion July 6, 1846. Accompanied C.C. Rich and Amasa M. Lyman to California, residing there for seven years. Took part in the move south, after he lived at Centerville until 1864. Called to assist in settling Bear Lake Valley, Idaho. He brought frist reaper, or mower, to Utah and Idaho. Moved to Vernal, Utah in 1885. Stone and brick mason. Died December 1905. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Charles Barton Mowrey/Mowry (1798 - 1872)
  Ruth Walkup Mowry (1798 - 1887)
 
 Spouse:
  Martha Jane Sergeant Mowrey (1827 - 1920)*
 
 Children:
  Sarah Ellen Sharp-Mowrey Thomas (1846 - 1937)*
  Angeline Mowrey (1848 - 1864)*
  Harley Mowrey (1850 - 1921)*
  Martha Jane Mowrey (1855 - 1855)*
  Ruth Caroline Mowrey Hansen (1856 - 1938)*
  Harriet Anne Mowrey Dingman (1858 - 1942)*
  Ellen Drucilla Mowrey Dingman (1861 - 1953)*
  Charles Barton Mowrey (1866 - 1957)*
  Uriah Mowrey (1869 - 1952)*
  Thomas Uriah Mowrey (1869 - 1952)*
  David Sargent Mowrey (1872 - 1889)*
  Fredrick Harley Mowrey (1876 - 1943)*
 
 Siblings:
  Sylvester Mowrey (1821 - 1884)*
  Harley Mowrey (1822 - 1920)
  Origin Mowrey (1825 - 1888)*
  Rhanaldo Mowery (1828 - 1906)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Vernal Memorial Park
Vernal
Uintah County
Utah, USA
 
Created by: Jerry T. Windley
Record added: Feb 02, 2001
Find A Grave Memorial# 5184214
Harley Mowrey, Sr
Added by: Jerry T. Windley
 
Harley Mowrey, Sr
Added by: Tom Todd
 
Harley Mowrey, Sr
Added by: Gary Mowrey
 
 
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Never to be forgotten! In Loving Memory from your Great-Great Grandson
- Gary Mowrey
 Added: Jul. 14, 2014

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 Added: Mar. 9, 2014

- Bradley
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