Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Find all Beacheys in:
 • Marysville Cemetery
 • Marysville
 • Yuba County
 • California
 • Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial!
Hilary "Hill" Beachey
Learn about removing the ads from this memorial...
Birth: 1822
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: May 24, 1875
San Francisco
San Francisco County
California, USA

Famous early pioneer of the Western states. Operated many stage lines in Idaho and Nevada, sometimes with the help of his nephew William C. Beachey. In fact, some histories, including official Nevada State Historical Markers, have merged them into one person!

__________________________________________________________

DEATH OF HILL BEACHY.

Brief Sketch of the Eventful Life of a Noted Pioneer.

Hil Beachy, whose prostration by a stroke of paralysis was mentioned on Friday, expired at hi slodgings, on Kearny street, about 7 o'clock yesterday morning. Although deprived of the power of speech, he was able to sign his will on Friday evning and signify his assent to teh various provisions framed by his friends. Deceased was a native of Lebanon, Ohio, about 53 years of age, and his career has been one of the most eventful and checkered of the brave and hardy pioneers who are now passing from the stage. He deserted the parental roof at the tender age of 12, and acquired his elementary education at steamboating on the Mississippi.

At the breaking out of the Mexican war he went to the Rio Grande, where he established a bakery and sold bread to the soldiers. He realized quite a large amount of money in the business but shortly became bankrupt, and retunred to steamboating, in which pursuit he reached the dignity of pilot. Untimately becoming tired of the occupation, he started across Mexico to Guaymas with three others, intending to take a sailing vessel for the Sandwich islands. Hearing of the discovery of gold in California, the party changed their minds and started for San Francisco, arriving here in 1849, with a doubloon to the joint treasurey. He started for hte interior, and in 1858 was married in Marysville to Miss Maggie Early, since deceased. He then went to Red Bluff, and started a hotel, called Luna House. At the beginning of the late civil war he sold out his business and went to Lewiston, on the Snake River, where he engaged once more in the hotel business, and in 1865 started a line of stages, wihch he continued to control until 1869 or 1870. His stage route extended over a distance of 700 miles, and was very profitable, although a large number of his horses were stolen by the Indians. It was here that he distinguished himself as an Indian fighter. On one occasion his stage was attacked by four Indians, and he fought them until he had killed thema ll. He cleared about $80,000 on his hotel and stage business. He then went into mining enterprises, and lost a good deal of money. His estate is now worth but very little. Among his effects was found a badge which certifies that he was a veteran of the Mexican War of 1846.

He achieved considerable notoriety a few years ago by arresing Lowery, Romaine, Howard and Page, the murderers of Lloyd Magruder and four others. Howard, Lowery and Romaine were dissolute characters hanging around Lewiston, and Beachy dreamed that Magruder, who was his intimate friend, had been killed by them. Magruder had not been murdered at this time, but had made a considerable sum of money in mining in another part of the country. The three men left Lewiston and were gone several months, during the course of wihch they fell in the Magruder and four others, killed them and returned to Lewiston. On their arrival Beachy, who had not yet heard of the death of Magruder, related his dream to the people and attempted to arrest these men, but his story was laughed at as a delusion. He, however, followed his men to San Francisco, and arrested them and a man named page, on suspicion of being murderers. He had great difficulty in obtaining a requisition for the prisoners, but he finally succeeded in obtaining permission to bring his men to Lewiston, where they were duly tried, convicted and exectured, Page having turned State's evidence.

The deceased leaves a daughter about twelve years of age, the only surviving member of a family that consisted of a wife and seven children. His remains were conveyed to Marysville to-day for interment in the same vault with his wife and children.

Evening Bulletin
San Francisco, California
24 May 1875
p. 3




DEATH OF HILL BEACHY.

We learn from the [Owhyee] Avalanche, of the sudden death of Hill Beachy at San Francisco on the 24th instant. No particulars are given, except that he would be buried in Marysville on the day following. Very few men on this coast were better known, or had more friends, or are more worthy of friends than Hill Beachy. He was honest and generous to a fault, and if the deeds of kindness which he had bestowed upon his fellow men were nted they would fill a volume, and his charities would count int he tens of thousands. He came to California in 1849, lived in teh mines, in San Francisco, Sacramento, Marysville and many other towns, but principally in Marysville, where he married an estimable lady, who was dearer to him than his own life. He moved from Marysville to Lewiston in this Territory in 1852 and build and kept the Luna House until 1865. It is sufficient to say that the name of Hill Beachy, connected with a hotel always made it popular. We could not do justice to his name and memory without mentionng his zeal and energy in the capture and prosecution of the Magruder murderers in 1863 and 1864. Magruder was Beachy's intimate friend. He had gone from Lewiston to Montana with a large cargo of goods, worth from $10,000 to $15,000. Magruder was expected back in the month of October. The stage office for the Walla Walla stage was kept by Beachy in the Luna House, and late one evening three ment came into the office muffled up, with their hats pulled down over their eyes and paid passage for four men, giving their names as Clark, Smith, etc. for Walla Walla, and the stage was to start the next morning at three o'clock, and the parties were to be called for at the French hotel near by. Beachy mistrusted that he knew these men while they were giving their names, and that they were Renton, Lower and Roman, desperate characers, who had started from Lewiston to Montana after Magruder left, and must have just returned from there. And his suspicions wernt further, he believed they had killed Magruder and his party for their money. He communicated these facts and suspictions to J. G. Berry, who had been pulled up at the end of a rope by these desperadoes, to make him disclose where he had hid his money. Beachy and Berry were busy all night until the stage started, tring to find who these passengers where and where they came from. They found they had come in on horseback from the mountains, but the horses had been hurreid off to a ranch; however, a saddle and some other things left at the stable, they believed to be Magruders. The next move was to identify them as Renton, Lower, and Roman, instead of Clark, Smith ect., names they had given. Berry, as well as Beachy was certain they could be satisfied on this point by taking a good look at their faces. To do this they procured a lantern, and when the stage drove up to the French Hotel and the passengers had got seated, Beachy stuck his lantern into the stage and close to the faces of these passengers, with a demand to see their tickets. During this ceremony, Beachy and Berry both took a good look at them, and recognized Renton, Lower, Roman and Billy Page. The stage drove on and their suspicions were more than ever confirmed, that these parties had started with the Magruder party, consisting of five men, and they havd made away with them in the mountains, had taken their money and were getting out of the country. Beachy still continued to look up evidence with regard to the arrival of these men, and the circumstances and suspicions became known and the whole town was excited about the matter. He procured a warrant for their arrest, and started for Walla Walla, but the stage was several hours aghead, and with several changes of horses drove through - 90 miles - without delay. When Beachy arrived at Walla Walla, they (the passengers) had all started for Portland via the Columbia river. But Beachy - not at all discouraged - followed close upon their heels, though when he got to Portland, his birds had just taken the ocean steamar for San Francisco, and no other boat would leave under ten days. Beachy here telegraphed for the arrest of these parties on the steamers arrival, and took the next steamer for San Francisco. Without giving further details, though he was put to great trouble and delay, by writs of Habeas corpus etc., Beachy returned with his prisoners to Lewiston, and kept them in the Luna house heavily ironed, under guards night and day, until the three first - Renton Lower and Romain - were tried by the civil authorities, convicted and hung. The latter, Page, turned states evidence. We will not repeat the circumstances of this terrible murder, it is sufficient to say, that these men were noted highwaymen and became traveling companions of Magruder for the very purpose of committing the deed, and that they did the dirty work 100 miles from any habitation, by killing five men, and four of them asleep for about $10,000. Beachy was not an officer, but interested himself as a good citizen to avenge the murder of his friend and rid the Territory of the three worst murders living. He never slackened a pace or yielded an inch until he had accomplished this great act of justice. We might mention other circumstances in his life as thrilling and perhaps as noble as this one, but it is unnecessary, most of our readers known the generous heart and noble impulses of Hill Beachy, better than we can state them. He sold out in Lewiston in 1865 and settled in this part of the Territory, and became the proprietor of the stage line from here to Silver City, and started the first stage line from Silver city to the Central Pacific Railroad. He had buried one child in Lewiston, and about 1867 buried his estimagel wife, leaving one child to survive here, though this one soon followed her mother. Although death overtook his family in distant places, he had them all placed together in the Marysville Cemetery, California. No kinder husband ever lived or one who love his family more, and although scarcely passed the prime of life he goes to sleep beside htem, with all who knew him, as friends and mourners for this sad bereavement.

Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman
Boise, Idaho
27 May 1875
p. 2

The funeral of the late Hill Beachy took place at Marysville on Monday.

Evening Bulletin
San Francisco, California
25 May 1875
p. 3

Marysville, May 24 - The funeral of the late Hill Beachy took place from the depot immediately upon the arrival of the passenger train from the south this evening, attended by his many friends and acquaintances. The pall-bearers were Messrs. James Hoorth, C. H. Patterson, N. D. Rideout, John H. Jewett, L. J. Ashford and George Merritt. The reamins were deposited to the City cemetery, besides those of his wife and children.

Arizona Miner
28 May 1875
p. 2

Death has been busy with the Pacific pioneers during the week. Our California dispatches announce the sudden termination of two valuable lives. Gen. Alfred Reddington and Hill Beachy. We have enjoyed the friendship of both for many years and now that they are dead, recall a thousand acts of kindness that we can never repay.

Arizona Weekly Miner
28 May 1875
p. 3


____________________________________________________________ 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Abraham Beachey (1793 - 1850)
  Elizabeth M Martin Beachey (1803 - 1884)
 
 Spouse:
  Margaret Early Beachy (____ - 1867)
 
 Children:
  Gray Beachy Michie (1866 - 1929)*
 
 Siblings:
  Martha E Beachey Bone (____ - 1864)*
  Sarah E Beachey Johnson (____ - 1891)*
  Thomas Beachey (1820 - 1893)*
  Hilary Beachey (1822 - 1875)
  Amanda Beachey Chandler (1822 - 1881)*
  Clement Beachey (1835 - 1917)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Marysville Cemetery
Marysville
Yuba County
California, USA
 
Created by: Kathleen B
Record added: Feb 19, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 65839368
Hilary Hill Beachey
Added by: Kathleen B
 
Hilary Hill Beachey
Added by: Kathleen B
 
Hilary Hill Beachey
Added by: V.M.T.
 
 
There is 1 more photo not showing...
Click here to view all images...
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.

 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service