Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Find all Aguirres in:
 • Choinumni Sacred Burial Grounds
 • Piedra
 • Fresno County
 • California
 • Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial!
Stephen Paul "Tinker" Aguirre
Learn about upgrading this memorial...
Birth: Jan. 29, 1966
Fresno
Fresno County
California, USA
Death: Apr. 5, 2005
California, USA

Stephen Aguirre woke up on the last day of his life with golf on his mind. He'd bought a club the day before for $20 at a thrift store though it might have cost $200 anywhere else. On a Sunday that marked the start of daylight-saving time and gave him an extra hour of light, he wanted to try out his prize.
The 39-year-old home renovator thought about taking his year-old son with him but decided against it. He kissed his wife, Kristlle, goodbye and aimed his Ford Escort toward a driving range about 10 minutes from his Camarillo townhouse. He never got there.

A man in a black Nissan, chased by a sheriff's squad car for reckless driving and refusing to pull over, barreled through a red light and into the Escort. Aguirre died instantly, his body crumpled on top of his golf clubs.

Aguirre was the fifth person killed in a police chase in Ventura County in the past four years and the second victim who wasn't involved in a pursuit but was guilty only of being on the wrong road at the wrong time.

After Aguirre's death on April 3, Ventura County Sheriff's Department officials said they would review their policies. Those policies urge officers and supervisors to weigh the risks of chasing motorists who won't stop but do not ban pursuits triggered by traffic infractions or misdemeanors.

About the same time Aguirre was thinking about his golf swing, Ventura County Sheriff's Deputy Bryan Sliva was on patrol in Camarillo, tracking a car driven erratically by David Inder Bagai, according to an accident report. At an intersection sandwiched by modest homes, Bagai allegedly stomped on his accelerator and swerved into another lane.

Sliva hit his siren and lights. He reported that when Bagai didn't pull over, he followed. Chase speeds reached 80 mph. In less than a minute, Bagai reached the intersection of Ponderosa and Carmen drives, where Stephen Aguirre was following a green light on his way to the freeway.

Aguirre, who was part Choinumni Indian, was laid to rest in an American Indian burial ground near Fresno. Bagai, 31, of Camarillo, was charged with vehicular manslaughter but deemed unable to stand trial because of mental health issues. He was recently released from a state hospital, placed in county jail and found competent for trial. Prosecutors say that, if convicted, he could face a maximum of seven years and three months in prison. Bagai has pleaded not guilty.


 
 
Inscription:
Beloved Husband, Father, Son & Brother! Some men are indispensable but others are ireplacable.
01/06/1966-04/03/2005
John 3:16
 
Burial:
Choinumni Sacred Burial Grounds
Piedra
Fresno County
California, USA
 
Maintained by: Kristlle Krueger-Aguirre
Originally Created by: Lester Letson
Record added: Nov 30, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 44952317
Stephen Paul Tinker Aguirre
Added by: Esther Christiansen
 
Stephen Paul Tinker Aguirre
Added by: Esther Christiansen
 
Stephen Paul Tinker Aguirre
Added by: Kristlle Krueger-Aguirre
 
 
There are 3 more photos not showing...
Click here to view all images...
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.

I'm sorry, rest in peace.
- Happiness/Love
 Added: Jul. 17, 2014
My Love, not a day passes that I do not think of you & miss you so much ! Our babies are growing fast.....our ALICIA graduated high school this past month & our baby boy Paul's starting his 2nd year playing football ...I wish so much you were here to shar...(Read more)
- Kristlle Krueger-Aguirre
 Added: Jul. 29, 2013

- dar
 Added: Apr. 19, 2012
There are 5 more notes not showing...
Click here to view all notes...
 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service