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Sophie Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Birth: Sep. 15, 1666
Celle
Celler Landkreis
Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
Death: Nov. 13, 1726
Heidekreis
Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany

Princess of Ahlden, de jure Queen of Great Britain. Daughter of Duke Georg Wilhelm of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Celle and Eleonore d'Olbreuse. She was married to Georg Ludwig of Hanover on November 18, 1682. As part of the marriage contract her husband had to part from his mistress which didn't make him love her more. Despite the coldness from her husband she gave birth to two children George August and Sophie Dorothea.After that she had completed her duty and was no longer needed. Georg Ludwig spend more time with his new mistress Ermengarde Melusine von der Schulenburg. Sophie Dorothea met Philipp Christoph von Königsmarck (qv) again and fell in love. Königsmark planed to go with her to Dresden to life at the court there but the plan was discovered and Königsmarck killed. He was never mentioned again after that night. Sophie Dorothea had to move to the Castle of Ahlden where she was told what to say in the following divorce trial. The fathers signed the divorce contract on September 1, 1694, the trial started ten days later and ended in January 7 1695. She was going to be guarded for the rest of her life, she wasn't allowed to remarry or to ever see her children again. There was no explanation why she was punished. In February she returned to Ahlden where she was guarded by 40 men. Some sources say that Georg August, who often visited his grandparents, tried to go to Ahlden several times against his fathers orders. During the first years she wasn't allowed to leave the castle without a guard. Later she was allowed to drive 2 kilometers to a bridge and back to the Castle. She stayed in close contact with her mother. After her fathers death in 1705 she became one of the richest woman in Europe. Queen Anne died in 1714 and Georg Ludwig was now George I. of Great Britain. The people of England where told several reasons why they didn't have a queen. Either she was mentally unstable, catholic or simply didn't exist. When the truth surfaced George I. became even more unpopular. Horace Walpole wrote that Georg August had two pictures of his mother in his bedroom. As a result of this his father forbid everyone to enter his sons bedroom. In August 1726 she became ill and had to stay in bed which she never left again. She was 61 years old and had spend 33 of these years imprisoned. George didn't allow the mourning in Hanover and London. He was furious when he heard that his daughters court in Berlin wore black. Sophie Dorotheas body was put into a casket and was deposit in the castles cellar. It was quietly moved to Celle in May 1727 to lie beside her parents. George I. died 4 weeks later. Cause of Death: Liver Failure and gall bladder occlusion due to 60 stones (bio by: Lutetia) 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
   King George I (1660 - 1727)*
 
 Children:
   George II (1683 - 1760)*
   Queen Sophie Dorothea of Hanover (1687 - 1757)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Stadtkirche St. Marien
Celle
Celler Landkreis
Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Lutetia
Record added: Mar 06, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 8476410
Sophie Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Added by: Lutetia
 
Sophie Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Frank K.
 
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- Catherine Shelton
 Added: Jul. 5, 2014

- Pamela Howlett
 Added: May. 1, 2014
RIP
-Anonymous
 Added: Apr. 14, 2014
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