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Armand Edward "A.E." Blackmar, I
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Birth: May 30, 1826
Vermont, USA
Death: Oct. 28, 1888
Louisiana, USA

Husband of Margaret Bridget (Meara) Blackmar, Son of Reuben Harmon Blackmar and Amanda (Cushman) Blackmar.
It has been reported that Armond's birth name is Harmon, like his fathers. Armond Edward Blackmar was born in Bennington, Vermont May 30, 1826. He attended Western Reserve College in Ohio. From 1852 to 1855 he was professor of music at Centenary College in Jackson, Louisiana. In 1858 he and his brother, Henry Clay Blackmar, started a music publishing company in Vicksburg, Mississippi. By 1860 they had moved to New Orleans, where they remained until at least 1882, except for a short period of time from 1862 to 1865 when his brother moved the operation to Augusta, Georgia, because Armond had been fined and imprisoned by General Ben Butler for publishing 'seditious' music. The descendents of the Blackmar family maintained homes and properties in New Orleans into the late twentieth century.
Beginning in 1860 "A.E." Blackmar issued more patriotic, "regional" Confederate music than any other publisher in New Orleans, including editions of Dixie, The Bonnie Blue Flag, and Maryland! My Maryland! In 1862, General Benjamin Butler took control of New Orleans, and confiscated all music at Blackmar's publishing venture. As he was escorted to jail, Blackmar whistled The Bonnie Blue Flag. The New Orleans music publishing house of A.E. Blackmar issued six editions of "The Bonnie Blue Flag" between 1861 and 1864 along with three additional arrangements. The Bonnie Blue Flag was such a contentious song that publication of that song brought about the arrest and imprisonment of Armond E. Blackmar. All copies of the song were ordered destroyed in the city of New Orleans by Union Army Captain Butler who ordered Blackmar arrested. Following imprisonment for publishing this song, A.E. Blackmar continued to publish under a variety of pseudonames such as Armond and A. Noir.
Crispin's day speech in William Shakespeare's play Henry V. The Bonnie Blue Flag was such a contentious song that publication of that song brought about the arrest and imprisonment of Armond E. Blackmar.
Blackmar practiced law in the city of New Orleans in the late 1800's. He was a very good violinist and pianist, a chess expert, and a charter member of the Chess, Checkers and Whist Club of New Orleans. Armond is listed in the "Biographical Dictionary of American Music. By Charles Eugene Claghorn. West Nyack, NY: Parker Publishing Co., 1973."
The refrain from The Bonnie Blue Flag/ often known as "Band of Brothers" has become quite famous and the words are as follows:
"The Bonnie Blue Flag" (Traduction)

" We are a band of brothers and native to the soil
Fighting for the property we gained by honest toil
And when our rights were threatened, the cry rose near and far
Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag that bears a single star."
Blackmar was the most prolific publisher of Confederate-Southern music of his time period.
Some of the music Blackmar published includes:

Dixie War Song (1861)"DIXIE"-Arranged under the pseudoname A.Noir, and published as A.E. Blackmar
The Bonnie Blue Flag (Confederate Anthem-Marching Theme)
Goober Peas (used pseudoname)
God and our rights (1861)
Short rations (1864)
Southern Marseillaise (1861/2)
The Southrons' Chaunt of defiance (1861)
The Beauregard Manassas quick-step (1861)
Those dark eyes. Favorite ballads of the South (1865/8)
Washington artillery polka march (1864)
You can never win us back; a patriotic song (1864)
Copyright owner and publisher of: Maryland! My Maryland!

The Bonnie Blue Flag was such a contentious song that publication of that song brought about the arrest and imprisonment of Armond E. Blackmar. All copies of the song were ordered destroyed in the city of New Orleans by Union Army Captain Butler who ordered Blackmar arrested. Following imprisonment for publishing this song, A.E. Blackmar continued to publish under a variety of pseudonames such as Armond, P. Nutt (Goober Peas) and A. Noir.
As a citizen living in New Orleans, A.E. Blackmar was a founding member of the Episcopal Church of New Orleans. The church was known for it's conversion of slaves to Christianity and for it's ministerial charity programs for those living in the local asylum.
A.E. was married to Margaret B. Meara in 1861. Blackmar's first child, born in 1861, was named Louisiana Rebel "Lulu" Blackmar. Further descendants were sisters Dorothy Blackmar, Margaret Mary Blackmar, and Mrs. Alicia Blackmar Anderson. All of the above made their homes in New Orleans, Louisiana.


 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Margaret Bridget Meara Blackmar (1838 - 1925)
 
 Children:
  Armand Edward Blackmar (1854 - 1924)*
  Louisiana Rebel Blackmar (1871 - 1936)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Greenwood Cemetery
New Orleans
Orleans Parish
Louisiana, USA
Plot: Blackmar Tomb
 
Created by: Farrar and related famil...
Record added: Jan 20, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 83759431
Armand Edward A.E. Blackmar, I
Added by: Farrar and related families
 
Armand Edward A.E. Blackmar, I
Added by: Farrar and related families
 
Armand Edward A.E. Blackmar, I
Added by: Farrar and related families
 
 
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 Added: May. 12, 2014

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 Added: Apr. 15, 2014

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 Added: Mar. 15, 2014
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