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Wilson Hoag Berdan
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Birth: 1831
New York, USA
Death: Mar. 8, 1882
Saline
Washtenaw County
Michigan, USA

Wilson Hoag was the son of David Berdan (B-1807 NY) and his wife Harriett (_).

4 BERDAN siblings: Anderson, Frances, Orange, and Ellen.

Wilson married Elizabeth Warner on 11/1/1852 in Adrian, Lenawee, MI. Elizabeth was the daughter of Jesse-6 Warner (3rd) and his wife Margaret "Peggy" Hutchinson, both of NY to MI.

2 BERDAN Children:
1. Dr. Dwight Warner Berdan (11/17/1853-7/11/1904), Cheboygan, Cheboygan, MI.
2. Edward Grant Berdan B-7/16/1864.

1870 Census for York Twp., Washtenaw, MI:
Wilson H. Berdan
Elizabeth Berdan
Dwight Berdan B-1853
Eddie Berdan B-1864

1880 Census for Saline, Washtenaw, MI:
Wilson Berdan B-1831 NY
Elizabeth Berdan B-1832 NY
Eddie Berdan [Child] B-1865 MI
__________
Source: Fraya Weiss, 2011.
__________
NOTE: is William Berdan related to Hiram Berdan, of Civil War Sharpshooters renown? Hiram was born in Phelps, Ontario, NY where so many of the Warner family lived; they moved to Michigan.

Hiram Berdan's father: John Berdan #19503182 and mother Hannah (Eldred) Berdan #19503192, both in Riverside Cemetery, Plymouth, Wayne, MI. [Discovered by me on 10/28/2011.]

Hiram Berdan was born September 6, 1824 in Phelps, Ontario, NY and died on March 31, 1893 from a heart attack; buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.

According to records in the Berdan family Bible (published 1817), Hiram Berdan was born to John Berdan (1800-1851) and Hannah Eldred (b. 1802). He was listed as one of seven children. The others were Tunis, Caroline, Vilett, Dwight, John and Marvin. [?A. George Berdan (b. 1827 to Peter Berdan and Mary Doolittle).] The fathers of Hiram and George were brothers. Research more at a later date...

MORE INFO:

Hiram's father was named John (see Maurice Berdan post of 10/24/00) who immigrated to Michigan from New York. He was described as a large landowner and [live]stock raiser in NY State before moving to Michigan. I suspect it is he who died in 1851. There were Berdan's living in the Plymouth, Canton Twp., MI area up until the end of the Civil War.

Hiram was born in 1824 the third of six children. He attended classes at Hobart College in NY and then apprenticed for John Hall's threshing machine company. Berdan made his own innovations to the threshing machine and then established a company in 1847 to sell this product. He also invented a gold ore separator, collapsible life boat and mechanical bakery. By selling the manufacturing rights to these inventions Hiram Berdan became a millionaire.

He married Mary (Marsh) Kimball in 1854 and the couple lived in New York City. I believe he had 2-3 children, all girls. Hiram Berdan was also a reknown marksman, and reputed to be one of the best rifle shots in the nation.

(1824-1893)
"While I am not related to the Berdans, I have been an avid researcher of Hiram Berdan, in particular his Sharp Shooters who distinguished themselves during the Civil War. If you can locate the book: Chief of Sharpshooters; Hiram Berdan, by Roy Marcot you will find a number of interesting facts regarding his inventions, Civil War service, and subsequent firearms and ammuntion innovations after the War. I will make a few brief remarks based on what I know about Hiram Berdan.

"Hiram's father was named John (see Maurice Berdan post of 10/24/00) who immigrated to Michigan from New York. He was described as a large landowner and stockraiser in that State before moving to Michigan. I suspect it is he who died in 1851. There were Berdan's living in the Plymouth area up until the end of the Civil War.

"Hiram was born in 1824 the third of six children. He attended classes at Hobart College in NY and then apprenticed for John Hall's threshing machine company. Berdan made his own innovations to the threshing machine and then established a company in 1847 to sell this product. He also invented a gold ore seperator, collapsible life boat and mechanical bakery. By selling the manufacturing rights to these inventions Hiram Berdan became a millionaire.

"He married Mary Marsh Kimball in 1854 and the couple lived in New York City. I believe he had 2-3 children, all girls. Hiram Berdan was also a reknown marksman, and reputed to be "one of the best rifle shots in the nation.

"With the outbreak of War, Berdan offered his services to President Lincoln and Gen. Winfield Scott, to "raise a Corps of expert marksmen". He was authorized to raise a regiment within 90 days, but so many qualified cantidates applied he was able to raise a second regiment. Michigan (Hiram's adopted state) sent 552 volunteers to serve in the United States "Berdan's" Sharp Shooters. New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota also provided close to 2500 men.

"Due to Berdan's insistence that his men be armed with breechloading Sharps rifles, fight in skirmish order (compared to the shoulder-to-shoulder lines of infantry), and instructed his sharpshooters to first shoot down enemy officers; he encountered great resistance from the War Dept.-who steadfastly resisted issuing orders to the Sharps Rifle Mfg. Company to begin production of breechloaders. Rising to the challenge Berdan showed he could be a showman as well. During a public shooting exhibition, popular during the early days of the War, He responded to a challenge by the Secretary of Ordnance by shooting the eye out of a drawn man-target from 600 yards distance. President Lincoln, who witnessed the shot began laughing, (Lincoln probably being one of the few dignitaries there who could appreciate the pure luck involved with Berdan's striking the forementioned target), and he invited Berdan to come to the White House where he personally signed the order for the Sharps breechloaders.

"Unfortunately, Hiram did not enjoy much support from his own men. Like many commanders of the period, he had no prior military training-and from accounts from the men-seemed like he did not learn even the most basic tactics, despite his being promoted to Colonel and commander of the 1st USSS. To his credit, Berdan attracted a number of gifted European and American subordinates who made the USSS into the potent fighting force it became.

"During a time when a Civil War leader was expected to lead from the front of his troops, Hiram was usually found behind the lines during the vicious battles. This lead to allegations of cowardice. However, with his men split up and under the command of brigade officers, there was often little for Berdan to do.

"During the fighting at Second Bull Run (1862)Berdan was struck by a shell fragment. Although the fragment did not penetrate his body, it did cause considerable trauma and bruising. Berdan reported health problems associated with this contusion for the remainder of his life.

"He left the Sharp Shooters permanently while on recruiting service following the battle at Gettysburg (1863). He then returned to inventing; this time modifying firearms into breechloaders. He invented the Berdan primer, Type 1-2 Berdan rifles and was instrumental in revolutionizing Russia's military firearms from antiquated muzzle-loaders to bolt-action breechloaders.

"Berdan was absent from the United States with his family (I believe he fathered Elisabeth during one of his leaves during the Civil War), during his inventions and buisness dealings in Europe and Russia.
This would coincide with your reference to the family living in Sorento.

"For his actions at Chancellorsville, Berdan was given the post-War promotion to Brigider General, and a brevet Major General for his actions at Gettysburg. He was active in the USSS reunions in the 1880's, and stimulated interest among his old soliders to submit their memoirs which became the book: Berdan's United States Sharp Shooters in the Army of the Potomac (C.A. Stevens. Reprinted by Morningside Books, Dayton Ohio).

"He died of a heart attack while in Washington D.C. in 1893 and was buried at Arlington.

"I hope you find this information helpful. Please refer to Mr.Marcot's and C.A.Steven's books for more extensive information. They are available through inter-library loan."

Bill Skillman, 2001. 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Elizabeth Warner Berdan (1832 - 1905)
 
 Children:
  Edward Grant Berdan (1864 - 1928)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Oakwood Cemetery
Saline
Washtenaw County
Michigan, USA
 
Maintained by: Mary E. Warner
Originally Created by: Bushong Weiss
Record added: Sep 27, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 77189202
Wilson Hoag Berdan
Added by: Robert Brown
 
Wilson Hoag Berdan
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Kim Jacobson
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.


- Mary E. Warner
 Added: Nov. 21, 2011
 
 
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