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Cliff Robertson
Birth: Sep. 9, 1923
Los Angeles
Los Angeles County
California, USA
Death: Sep. 10, 2011
Stony Brook
Suffolk County
New York, USA

American Actor. He had a film and television career that spanned half of a century. He won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the movie Charly. His most recent film role was "Uncle Ben Parker" in the Spider-Man film series. He played a future President of the United States in PT 109 (chosen personally by John F. Kennedy to portray the then-Lt. Kennedy) and a presidential candidate in The Best Man (1964). Later came Charly (an adaptation of Flowers for Algernon for which he won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Actor). Other films included Picnic (1955), Autumn Leaves (1956), Gidget (1959), Sunday in New York (1963), Devil's Brigade (1968), Too Late the Hero (1970), J. W. Coop (1972), Three Days of the Condor (1975), Obsession (1976), Star 80 (1983) and Malone (1987). More recently, Robertson's career has had a resurgence. He appeared as Uncle Ben Parker in the first movie adaptation of Spider-Man (2002), as well as in the sequels Spider-Man 2 (2004) and Spider-Man 3 (2007). He commented on his website that "Since Spider-Man 1 and 2, I seem to have a whole new generation of fans. That in itself is a fine residual." He was also in the horror film Riding the Bullet (2004). His television appearances included The Twilight Zone episodes "A Hundred Yards Over the Rim" (1961) and "The Dummy" (1962) followed by guest starring roles in such series as the NBC medical drama about psychiatry The Eleventh Hour (1963) in the role of Jeff Dillon, "The Man Who Came Home Late". In 1958, he portrayed Joe Clay in the very first broadcast of Playhouse 90's Days of Wine and Roses, in what some critics cite as the superior version of this poignant story. Other network appearances included The Greatest Show on Earth (1963) and ABC's Breaking Point (1964) and the ABC Stage 67 episode "The Trap of Gold" (1966). He had a starring role in the live space opera Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers (195354), as well as recurring roles on Hallmark Hall of Fame (1952), Alcoa Theatre (1959), and Playhouse 90 (1958, 1960), The Outlaws (three episodes as Chad Burns), Batman as the villainous gunfighter Shame (1966, 1968), Falcon Crest (198384) as Dr. Michael Ranson, and most recently, The Lyon's Den (2003). He had starring roles in episodes of both the 1960s and 1990s versions of The Outer Limits. He was awarded an Emmy for his leading role in an 1965 episode from Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre entitled "The Game". His second appearance on Batman featured his wife, Dina Merrill. In 1989, he narrated an AT&T promotional video documenting some of its technological improvements at the time. Incidentally, Robertson, who for ten years was a national TV spokesman for AT&T (which won him the Advertising Age award for best commercial), was to be the keynote speaker at an AT&T stockholders' meeting during a strike by AT&T workers. Robertson refused to cross the picket line and did not speak at the meeting. In the same year he was a member of the jury at the 39th Berlin International Film Festival. (bio courtesy of: Wikipedia) 
 
Burial:
Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend.
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: I Remember When
Record added: Sep 10, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 76310181
Cliff Robertson
Added by: katzizkidz
 
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Handsom, talented and always full of life. You were one of the greats. You are missed.
- A Marine's Widow
 Added: Apr. 6, 2014
To a great actor!
- AJT
 Added: Mar. 25, 2014

- Sunshine>♥<
 Added: Mar. 15, 2014
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Current ranking for this person: (4.6 after 306 votes)
 

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