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Charles Clayton
Birth: Oct. 5, 1825
Derbyshire, England
Death: Oct. 4, 1885
Oakland
Alameda County
California, USA

US Congressman. A native of England, Clayton came to the United States in 1842 and settled in California a few years later. In 1849 he was appointed Alcalde (Mayor) of Santa Clara until 1850. After moving to San Francisco, he was elected to the California State Assembly from 1863 until 1866, as well as to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors from 1864 until 1869. In 1873 he was elected to the United States House of Representatives representing California's 1st District until 1875. He also briefly served as California State Prison Director from 1881 until 1882. (bio by: G.Photographer) 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  John Clayton (1784 - 1862)
  Mary Bates Clayton (1790 - 1852)
 
 Spouse:
  Hannah T. Clayton (____ - 1912)
 
 Siblings:
  Joel Henry Clayton (1812 - 1872)*
  John Clayton (1818 - 1866)*
  Charles Clayton (1825 - 1885)
  James Adkin Clayton (1831 - 1896)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Mountain View Cemetery
Oakland
Alameda County
California, USA
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Apr 27, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 7393295
Charles Clayton
Added by: Mr. Ed
 
Charles Clayton
Added by: G.Photographer
 
Charles Clayton
Added by: G.Photographer
 
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- Cheryl Tovar
 Added: Dec. 16, 2010

- Frank Everett
 Added: Oct. 5, 2009

- MC
 Added: Sep. 10, 2009
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