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 • Almer Township Cemetery
 • Caro
 • Tuscola County
 • Michigan
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David June
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Birth: Sep. 26, 1830
Lyons
Wayne County
New York, USA
Death: Feb. 15, 1915
Caro
Tuscola County
Michigan, USA

David June was the son of Chapman June and Sally Gee.

Biography of David June:

DAVID JUNE, farmer, born in Lyons, Wayne County, N. Y., September 26, 1829, was reared in Farmington, Oakland County, Mich. He came to Almer, then a part of Indian Fields, August 29, 1853. He had been married to Miss Elizabeth Delling, of Southfield, Oakland County, Mich., January 6, 1852. She was born in Lyons, N.Y. February 13, 1828. Her parents came to Michigan when she was about eighteen months old, but are now both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. June have one adopted daughter, Edna, now Mrs. Eugene Ames.

Mr. June's first improvement on his place was to chop a small piece and hedge it in with the brush of the timbers and to erect a shanty 16 x 14 feet outside, which they covered with poles and shakes. They brought one load of their goods through from Oakland County with a hired horse team. It was the first horse team that ever passed from Caro to their place. Mr. June then at once set out for East Saginaw with a hired ox team to get their tools, provisions, and cooking stove. Mrs. June remained to unpack their bedding and arrange their new home. She could get no straw for their beds, and a Miss Dickinson suggested that she might fill them with fine hemlock brush. This she did and they used brush beds until they raised straw on their own place.

After retiring on that first night Mrs. June was soon greeted with a doleful howling of wolves near the shanty, which had only a blanket for a door, but the fires at which their food had been cooked kept these natives at a respectful distance. On his return Mr. June made a door from a board which he brought from Vassar in two pieces on the sides of his load of goods. This was the only piece of lumber in the building. The floor they made of basswood puncheons. Their first roof was too flat and the first rain that came drenched them copiously, but a second effort at roofing secured them an effectual shelter. Into this rude dwelling they cheerfully entered as their first forest home.

When they brought in their goods they had to follow lumbering trails among the trees from Vassar to where Caro now is. From there they had to underbrush and cut a track, the team waiting at intervals for the track to be opened before them. The first season he cleared ten acres and raised corn on part of it, but his chief crop was wheat. In the second winter after he came he lumbered for Mr. S.P. Sherman, and drew the mammoth pine logs (some of them five feet through), from the forest, then newly broken, which has since become the thriving town of Caro.

In those days Mr. June wore one pair of buckskin pants five years. They at last became too short for comfort, and Mrs. June made them into mittens.

Once when taking a grist to Vassar his oxen became so entirely exhausted that further advance seemed impossible, but, prompted by oats placed a short distance before them, they took the load by short pulls up the entire hill. Thus before physical strength and pioneer industry the lofty forest has been made to bow, and he now has his farm of eighty acres all under cultivation and grass. He is also engaged in the culture of Poland China hogs and short horn Durham cattle. They have between two and three acres of thriving orchard of the best varieties of apples; also plums, pears, peaches, and grapes, a good dwelling and other commodious farm buildings, rendering the estate truly an inviting home.

Mr. June has been township supervisor, has served six years as treasurer, and ten or twelve years as justice of the peace.

(History of Tuscola and Bay Counties, Mich. with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of their Prominent Men and Pioneers. Chicago: H.R. Page and Company, 1883.)

Obituary:

DIED ON FARM HE SETTLED 62 YEARS AGO
DAVID JUNE, ALMER PIONEER WAS KNOWN THROUGHOUT TUSCOLA CO.
BROUGHT FIRST TEAM TO LOCALITY

Was Familiar Figure About Town Until Weight of Years Began to Tell

David June died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edna Ames in Almer, Monday, February 15, 1915, at the age of 84 after ailing for nearly a year on account of his advanced years.

Mr. June was born in Lyons, N. Y. September 26, 1830, but his early boyhood was spent in Farmington, Mich. He came to Almer, then a part of Indianfields, August 29, 1853. The previous year he was married to Miss Elizabeth Delling of Southfield, Mich. Mr. June settled on the farm on which he died in October 1853 and was obliged to chop a road through the woods from the standpipe corner a mile north of his homestead, drawing his few possessions on a "sled".

H. D. Hamilton and J. D. Sutton are the only persons now living who were residents of Almer Township when Mr. June arrived in the county.

It was interesting to hear Mr. June relate his early experiences in the wilderness. The first improvement he made on his place was to chop a small place and hedge it with brush of the timbers and to erect a shanty 16x14 feet outside which they covered with poles and shakes. With the first team that ever passed from Caro to their place he brought a load of their goods from Oakland county.

In settling their home they made their bed out of fine hemlock brush until they could raise some straw on their place. The first season he cleared ten acres and raised corn on part of it, but his chief crop was wheat.

In the second winter after he came, he lumbered for S. P. Sherman and drew the mammoth pine logs, some of them five feet through, from the forest which has since become the thriving little city of Caro. Through physical strength and pioneer industry the lofty forest became a farm of eighty acres under cultivation.

Mr. June had been township supervisor, had served six years as treasurer and about twelve years as justice of peace.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at the home of his adopted daughter, Mrs. Edna Ames, who has been very faithful to him and burial was in Almer Cemetery, conducted by Rev. E. J. Warren. Besides his daughter he leaves one sister, Mrs. Martha Delling of Gagetown.

(Tuscola County Advertiser, Feb. 19, 1915.)

Obituary courtesy of Gloria Hall.
 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Elizabeth Chadwick Delling June (1828 - 1910)
 
Burial:
Almer Township Cemetery
Caro
Tuscola County
Michigan, USA
Plot: Block 2, Lot 17
 
Created by: Joann Geybels
Record added: Jun 29, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 72216588
David June
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Ellinda
 
 
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- Heather Riley
 Added: Feb. 24, 2014
 
 
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