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Joseph Forshaw, Jr
Birth: May 13, 1881
Saint Louis
St. Louis City
Missouri, USA
Death: Nov. 26, 1964
Saint Louis
St. Louis City
Missouri, USA

Olympic Athlete. He had the rare distinction of competing in three different Olympic marathons. He placed 12th in 1905 in Athens, third in 1908 in London and 10th in 1912 in Stockholm. At the 1908 event, he was introduced as "Forshaw of St. Louis" and when he returned home with the bronze medal, his father changed the name of his company from the Forshaw Company to Forshaw of St. Louis. He also held the world record for running up Pike's Peak. He formed one of the area's first ice hockey teams at Central High School in 1899 and he played amateur hockey at age 48. He also established the record of skating 100 miles on the Meramec River in nine hours. Mr. Forshaw became president of his father's famous company in 1925. (bio by: Connie Nisinger) 
 
Burial:
Bellefontaine Cemetery
Saint Louis
St. Louis City
Missouri, USA
Plot: Block 323, Lot 3753
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Connie Nisinger
Record added: Feb 19, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 7196645
Joseph Forshaw, Jr
Added by: ET
 
Joseph Forshaw, Jr
Added by: Richard Blunk
 
Joseph Forshaw, Jr
Added by: Connie Nisinger
 
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