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Maud of Chester
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Birth: 1171
Chester
Cheshire, England
Death: Jan. 6, 1233, England

Maud of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon, was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, sometimes known as Matilda de Kevelioc. She was a daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, and the wife of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon. Through her daughter, Isobel, she was an ancestress of Robert the Bruce.
Lady Maud was born in 1171, the eldest child of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, a cousin of King Henry II of England. Her paternal grandparents were Ranulf de Gernon and Maud of Gloucester, the granddaughter of King Henry I of England. Her maternal grandparents were Simon III de Montfort and Mahaut. Lady Maud had four siblings including Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester, Mabel of Chester, Countess of Arundel, and Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln. She also had an illegitimate half-sister, Amice of Chester.
Maud's father died in 1181 when she was ten years of age. He had served in King Henry's Irish campaigns after his estates had been restored to him in 1177. They had been confiscated by the King as a result of his taking part in the baronial Revolt of 1173-1174. His son Ranulf succeeded him as Earl of Chester, and Maud became a co-heiress of her brother.
On 26 August 1190, she married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon, a Scottish prince, son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, and a younger brother of Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland. He was almost thirty years Maud's senior. The marriage was recorded by Benedict of Peterborough. David and Maud had seven children:
John of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1207- 6 June 1237), married Elen ferch Llywelyn. He succeeded his uncle Ranulf as Earl of Chester in 1232, but he died childless.
Henry of Huntingdon (died young)
Robert of Huntingdon (died young)
Margaret of Huntingdon (c.1194- after 1 June 1233), married Alan, Lord of Galloway, by whom she had two daughters, including Dervorguilla of Galloway.
Isobel of Huntingdon (1199- 1251), married Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale, by whom she had two sons, including Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale.
Ada of Huntingdon, married Sir Henry de Hastings, by whom she had one son, Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.
Matilda of Huntingdon
Maud died on 6 January 1233 at the age of about sixty-two. Her husband had died in 1219. In 1290, upon the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway, which caused the extinction of the legitimate line of William I, the descendants of David and Maud became the prime competitors for the crown of Scotland. Through their daughter, Isobel, they were the direct ancestors of the renowned Scottish King, Robert the Bruce.
Her husband David had four illegitimate children by various mistresses 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Hugh de Kevelioc (1147 - 1181)
 
 Spouse:
  David of Scotland (1144 - 1219)
 
 Children:
  Ada Huntingdon*
  Isobel of Huntingdon (1199 - 1251)*
  John of Scotland (1207 - 1237)*
 
 Sibling:
  Maud of Chester (1171 - 1233)
  Agnes Kevelioc De Ferrers (1174 - 1247)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Sawtry Abbey
Sawtry
Huntingdonshire District
Cambridgeshire, England
 
Created by: Kat
Record added: May 14, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 69827822
Maud of Chester
Cemetery Photo
Added by: raddison01
 
 
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Rest in peace to my 28th great grandmother.
- Vicki Marmillot
 Added: Aug. 12, 2015

- Bonnie's Daughter
 Added: Aug. 11, 2015
My 24th Generation Grandmother
- Michael Davis
 Added: Jul. 22, 2015
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