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Sgt Hugh Cole, I
Birth: Jun. 29, 1628
Barnstaple
Devon, England
Death: Jan. 22, 1698
Swansea
Bristol County
Massachusetts, USA

Hugh Cole is buried here in an unmarked grave. Most likely his marker was broken at some point.
Hugh Cole was b. 29 June 1628 in Barnstaple, Devonshire, England. His parents were James Cole and Mary Tibbs. Hugh m. 8 Jan 1654 Mary Foxwell, d/o Richard Foxwell & Anne Shelley. Hugh and Mary Foxwell Cole had at least 10 children; See the links below.......
After the death of Hugh's 1st wife, Mary Foxwell, Hugh m. 2nd to Elizabeth Lettice Shurtliffe Cook. Hugh Cole was a freeman in Plymouth, MA in 1657. He was in the Barnstable MA Militia in 1643. Hugh was a surveyor of highways in Barnstable, MA. He was also a landowner there. He was a selectman in Swansea, MA.
Source: "The Descendants of James Cole, 1908", By E.B. Cole, pp. 25-27.

Please see his children and wifes who are linked with his memorial for details births, deaths and marriages of all children and wifes.........-------------------------
More information about him:

"As a young man, he was paid 50 bushels of corn for tending the cows of the townspeople. On 6 Jun 1655, the grand jury presented " Hugh Cole and Mary Foxwell, his now wife, in keeping company each other in an undecent manner, at an unseasonable time and place, before marriage." Hugh was fined 20s.
On the 1643 Plymouth list of men able to bear arms. When he moved to Swansea in 1668, he built a home on the west bank of the Mattaposett (now Cole's River). He negotiated land purchases from the Indians and worked as a surveyor. He also served as selectman 1672 to 1675 and as a deputy to the Plymouth Colony General Court. He had frequent dealings with the Indians, including King Philip. Legend has it two of his sons were kidnapped prior to King Phillip's war and were returned by order of King Phillip. Phillip also supposedly warned Hugh of pending attacks, allowing him to remove his family to Portsmouth." (www.arq.net/~1jacobs/cole.html)

From "The Descendants of James Cole of Plymouth 1633" -- He was admitted as freeman of Plymouth in 1657. He came with his father to Plymouth in 1633. page 25. He was made surveyor of highways at Barnstable and granted 100 acres of land at Acushauett. In 1667 with others he purchased from King Phillip 500 acres of land on the west bank of what was named for him Coles River. He was a shipwright and civil engineer and many of the tracts of land of Swansea were surveyed by him. He was a selectman of Swansea for many years and was representative and deputy to the general court in the years 1773, 1774, 1775, 1780, 1783, 1784, 1785, 1786, and 1789. He was for years the friend of King Phillip. Having been requested by the Plymouth Colony council to visit King Phillip and report the conditions. Hugh Cole was granted 50 acres of land lying between Manneonest Point and the Salt Marsh with all the appurtenancews thereunto belonging, unto him and his heirs forever. He was granted by the court respecting his father's grant, he being an ancient freeman. Six score acres of land between the Mattapoiset River and the bounds of Acushassett. In June 1675, at the commencement of the war with King Phillip, two of Hugh Cole's sons were made prisoners by the Indians and taken to Phillip at Mount Hope. Phillip ordered them set at liberty, because, as he said, Hugh Cole had always been his friend. He sent word to Hugh that he could no longer restrain his warriors, and for him to take his family and immediately remove to Rhode Island. This he did, and one hour afterward his home was in flames. While he had been on such friendly terms with Phillip, his was the first home burned and Gershom Cole was the first person killed. After leaving his home Hugh Cole relocated at Portsmouth, RI. The town records of Portsmouth show that Oct. 12, 1675, Hugh Cole was granted liberty to use some of the windfalls that are down to build a small frame and to make wheels for the use of the townsmen for their money. Hugh was a sergeant in the war against King Phillip. After the war in his election as representative he is always spoken of as sergeant. After the close of the war, 1677, he returned to Swansea and built a house a few rods from where Miss Abby Cole now Lives, 1908. This part of the land has descended by will, no deed having been made for it; it has never passed out of the possession of the Cole family. Part of the land owned by him is now in Warren, RI. He died in Swansea, 22 Jan. 1699 and was buried in the Southern extreme of Meadow Neck, now known as Howland Meadow in Barrington, in what is known as the Tyler Point Cemetery. He had ten children, the first seven born in Plymouth and the other three in Swansea." page 25 - 27.
"The descendants of James Cole of Plymouth 1633" Written by Ernest Byron Cole., New York: Grafton Press, 1908"HUGH COLE was the 2nd son of James Cole. He was born in London, England, 1627; he came with his father to Plymouth, Mass, in 1633, and was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth in 1657. He m. 1. Jan. 8, 1654, Mary Foxwell, d/o Richard and Ann (Shelly) Foxwell of Barnstable Mass. She was b. in Scituate, Aug. 17, 1635, and died in Swansea, Mass. (Her father, Richard Foxwell came from England with Governor Winthrop in 1631, and the same year removed to Scituate and was admitted as freeman. He removed to Barnstable, and was a member of the Barnstable Militia in 1643.) He m. 2.Elizabeth, widow of Jacob Cook, former widow of William Shurtiffe, and d/o Thomas and Ann Lettuce of Plymouth. She died in Swansea, Mass., on Oct. 31,1693. He m. 3. January 30, 1694, Mary, widow of Deacon Ephraim Morton, former widow of William Harlow, and d/o Robert and Judith Shelly, a cousin of his first wife. The following appears upon the Plymouth records: "April 8, 1634. It was agreed with James Cole that his son Hugh shall keep the Cows from April. 15 to November, and shall have for his pay fifty bushels of corn. He shall bring them up every morning to be milked and then carry back to feed and bring them home at night. "He was made surveyor of highways at Barnstable, and granted 100 acres of land at Acushauett. In 1669 with others he purchased of King Phillip 500acres of land on the west bank of what was named for him Coles River. He was a shipwright and civil engineer, and many of the tracts of land of Swansea were surveyed by him. He was a selectman of Swansea for many years, and was representative and deputy to the general court in the years, 1773,'74, '75, '80, ''83, '84, '85, '86, 'and '89. He was for years the friend of King Phillip, the Indian Chief. Having been requested by the Plymouth Colony Council to visit King Phillip and report the conditions made the following report: "Swansea, April. 1, 1671. Most Honorable Sirs:--Yours I received this day whereby I perceive you desire to know that posture the Indians are in. I do not find them to continue in a posture of war as they have been. I went to Mount Home last second day on purpose to see their reproceedings and was inmany of their houses, but saw no the ing as intending to war. But asking themof their reason of continuing together at Mt. Hope, they answered, it was to see Phillip's child buried, and I have seen some return, but the greater part of them are together. And they gave as the reason, because the wind does so blow against them that they cannot go home with their canoes--not else. Rest assured I am yours to command what I am able. "HUGH COLE "
Oct. 27, 1669"Hugh Cole was granted 50 acres of land lying between Manneonest Pointand the Salt March with all the appurtenances thereunto belonging, unto himand his heirs forever. (pg. 149, vol. 3, Plymouth Records.) He was grantedby the court respecting his father's grant, he being an ancient freemen.Six score acres of land between the Mattapoiset River and the bounds ofAcushassett.In June, 1675, at the commencement of the war with King Phillip, two ofHugh Cole's sons were made prisoners by the Indians and taken to Phillip at Mount Hope. Phillip ordered them set at liberty, because, as he said, Hugh Cole had always been his friend. He sent word to Hugh that he would no longer restrain his warriors, and for him to take his family and immediately remove to Rhode Island. This he did, and one hour afterward his home was inflames. While he had been on such friendly terms with Phillip, his was the first house burned, and Gershom Cole was the first person killed. After leaving his home, Hugh Cole located at Portsmouth, R.I. The town records of Portsmouth show that, Oct. 12, 1675, Hugh Cole was granted liberty to use some of the windfalls that are down to build a small frame, and to make wheels for the use of the townsmen for their money. Savage says: "Hugh was a sergeant in the war against King Phillip." After the war in his election as representative he is always spoken of as sergeant. After the close of the war, 1677, he returned to Swansea and builta house a few rods from where Miss Abby Cole now lives. The well walled by him on the bank of the Kickemuit River is still there. This part of the land has descended by will, no deed having been made for it; it has never passed out of possession of the Cole family and is now owned by Miss Abby Cole. Part of the land owned by him in Swansea is now a part of Warren, R.I. He died in Swansea, Jan. 22, 1699, and was buried in the southern extream of Meadow Neck, now known as Howland Meadow in Barrington, in what is known at the Tyler Point Cemetery. He had ten children, the first seven were born in Plymouth, the other three in Swansea.


Hugh Cole was a surveyor of highways at Barnstable, and was granted 100 acres of land at Acushhauett. In 1667 with others, he purchased from Indian Chief King Phillips 500 acres of land on the west bank of what was named for him Coles River. He was a shipwright (ship builder) and civil engineer. He was a representive of Swansea for many years and a deputy to the general court. In June 1675, at the beginning of the war with his friend, Chief King Phillip, tow of Hugh Cole's sons were made prisoners by the Indians and taken to Phillip at Mt. Pope. Phillip ordered them set free because he said, "Hugh Cole had always been a friend." He sent word to Hugh through his sons, that he could no longer restrain his warriors, and for him to take his family and leave immediately. he did so and less than 1 hour after leaving, his home was in flames. Hugh had 10 children, the first 7 were born in Plymouth, and the other three in Swansea. 1657-he was an admitted freeman (citizen) in Plymouth, MA 1667-purchased 500 acres of land from Indian Chief Phillip 1675-was a sergeant during the war with Chief King Phillip 6/29/1628 christened Barnstaple Parish Register He was for years friends with Indian Chief King Phillip.

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Family links: 
 Parents:
  James Cole (1600 - 1692)
 
 Spouse:
  Mary Foxwell Cole (1635 - 1688)
 
 Children:
  James Cole (1655 - ____)*
  Hugh Cole (1658 - 1738)*
  John Cole (1660 - 1748)*
  Martha Cole Sweeting (1662 - 1711)*
  Anna Cole Salisbury (1664 - 1704)*
  Ruth Cole Luther (1666 - 1718)*
  Joseph Cole (1668 - ____)*
  Ebenezer Cole (1671 - 1719)*
  Mary Cole Kingsley (1676 - 1756)*
  Benjamin Cole (1678 - 1748)*
 
 Siblings:
  James Cole (1626 - 1709)*
  Hugh Cole (1628 - 1698)
  John Cole (1637 - 1677)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Tyler Point Cemetery
Barrington
Bristol County
Rhode Island, USA
 
Created by: Betty
Record added: Apr 08, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 68057988
Sgt Hugh Cole, I
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Debi
 
 
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9th gr grandfather.Rest in Peace...
- Glenda Floyd
 Added: Jan. 15, 2014
To my 9th great grandfather. You are a true American founder of this great country.ColletteDAR memeber
- Collette
 Added: Oct. 30, 2013
In Memory of my 9th Great Grandfather. You made it through some trying times in our history, RIP
- Mary Gilmore
 Added: Oct. 17, 2013
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