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Find all Herndons in:
 • Herndon and Beauchamp Cemetery
 • Russellville
 • Logan County
 • Kentucky
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Capt James Herndon
Birth: 1737
Caroline County
Virginia, USA
Death: Jan. 15, 1815
Russellville
Logan County
Kentucky, USA

During the American Revolution, James Herndon commanded a company of Chatham County North Carolina Militia which in 1779 marched to Camden Courthouse and Charlestown, SC. The regimental commander was Colonel Lytle, whose regiment was a part of the army of General Benjamin Lincoln. References are found of James Herndon, as a captain, and as commander of a fort. He was one of the prisoners captured by David Fanning in his attack on Pittsboro, who reported to Governor Burke, 22 July 1781 from the camp at McFall's Mill, Raft Swamp, concerning their capture.
Married to Isabella Thompson. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  William Herndon (1706 - 1773)
  Sarah Poe Herndon (1710 - 1793)
 
 Children:
  George Herndon (1762 - 1848)*
  Elisha Herndon (1768 - 1826)*
  Cornelius Herndon (1768 - 1818)*
  Frances Herndon West (1772 - 1808)*
  James Herndon (1781 - 1852)*
  John Herndon (1785 - 1858)*
  Mary Herndon Wilkins (1792 - 1836)*
  Joseph Herndon (1798 - 1850)*
 
 Sibling:
  James Herndon (1737 - 1815)
  George Herndon (1740 - 1816)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Herndon and Beauchamp Cemetery
Russellville
Logan County
Kentucky, USA
 
Created by: David Reese
Record added: Oct 27, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 60712338
Capt James Herndon
Added by: Eric & Tami Lowery
 
Capt James Herndon
Added by: David Reese
 
 
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An American Patriot. Thank you for your Service. Rest in Peace.
- Sam D. Hatcher
 Added: Sep. 20, 2013

- Dorothy Morgan
 Added: Jun. 1, 2012

- Judy
 Added: Jun. 5, 2011
 
This page is sponsored by: David Reese

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