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 • Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
 • San Antonio
 • Bexar County
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Joseph Howard Gilbreth
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Birth: Jul. 27, 1905
Deerfield
Lake County
Illinois, USA
Death: Nov. 29, 1962
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA

Colonel, U.S. Army. Awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart.

Born at Fort Sheridan Military Reservation to Captain, later Colonel, Joseph Lee and Isoline (Howard) Gilbreth.

Married Leona Lucy Ferrandou about March 1929 in Eufaula, Alabama.

1927 USMA graduate; commissioned Infantry. Commander of Combat Command R (CCR) of the Ninth Armored Division, he was one of the officers in charge of American armor facing the Germans east of Bastogne in the early days of the Battle of the Bulge.

For additional details on his Army career, see:USMA Cullum Register entries.
 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Joseph Lee Gilbreth (1875 - 1949)
  Isoline Marie Howard Gilbreth (1882 - 1967)
 
 Spouse:
  Leona F Brooks (1909 - 1998)
 
 Children:
  Joseph Howard Gilbreth (1929 - 1929)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:
Joseph
Howard
Gilbreth

Illinois

Colonel
U.S. Army
World War II
July 27 1905
November 29 1962
BSM - PH
 
Burial:
Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section PC, Site 8-C
 
Created by: John Bursley
Record added: Aug 24, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 57608913
Joseph Howard Gilbreth
Added by: John Bursley
 
Joseph Howard Gilbreth
Added by: LKat
 
Joseph Howard Gilbreth
Added by: LKat
 
 
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- LKat
 Added: May. 4, 2014
Class of 1927 (Cullum No. 8106)
- Bill Thayer (History of West Point)
 Added: Mar. 14, 2011
 
 
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