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 • Washington
 • District of Columbia
 • District Of Columbia
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Jane Johnston Hepburn Dallam
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Birth: Mar. 13, 1819
Georgetown
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA
Death: Jan. 15, 1900
Washington
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA

She was married to Benjamin Rush Dallam on October 18, 1849. She was the daughter of John Muir and Eliza Stith Johnston.

The Washington Post January 16, 1900
Died.
Dallam. On Monday, January 15, 1900 at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Jane Johnston Dallam, widow of the late B. Rush Dallam.

Funeral services at Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel, Wednesday, January 17 at 4PM. (Please omit flowers). 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  John Muir Hepburn (1790 - 1850)
  Eliza Stith Johnston Hepburn (1795 - 1864)
 
 Spouse:
  Benjamin Rush Dallam (1820 - 1866)
 
 Siblings:
  Jane Johnston Hepburn Dallam (1819 - 1900)
  Susan Stith Hepburn Muir (1825 - 1910)*
  Eliza Johnston Hepburn Yarnall (1828 - 1900)*
  Annie Leake Hepburn Powell (1835 - 1920)*
  Catherine Eloise Hepburn (1837 - 1849)*
  Maria Augusta Hepburn Allen (1838 - 1875)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Oak Hill Cemetery
Washington
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA
Plot: North Hill, Lot 53.
 
Created by: SLGMSD
Record added: Oct 10, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 42922563
Jane Johnston <i>Hepburn</i> Dallam
Added by: Loretta Castaldi
 
Jane Johnston <i>Hepburn</i> Dallam
Added by: David McInturff
 
Jane Johnston <i>Hepburn</i> Dallam
Added by: David McInturff
 
 
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- SLGMSD
 Added: Dec. 18, 2013

- SLGMSD
 Added: Sep. 1, 2012
 
 
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