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Abel Wade Payne
Birth: Jun. 17, 1841
Vermilion County
Illinois, USA
Death: Mar. 8, 1923
Vermilion County
Illinois, USA

Co. L, 16th Illinois Cav.;
Andersonville survivor

Abel was a 22-year-old corporal in January 1864 when he was captured in Jonesville, Virginia. A month later, he was moved to Andersonville prison in Georgia.

He had first enlisted into the U.S. Army in April 1861 when he was almost 20 years old. He and his cousin Asa A. Payne enlisted into Co. C, 12th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.

Abel mustered out of Co. C, 12th Reg., on August 1, 1861, and within two weeks he was enrolled in Co. K, 37th Illinois Volunteers. In April 1862, he was discharged at Rolla, Missouri, because of a disability.

After ten months of healing, he enrolled again in February 1863. In April 1863 he was mustered into Co. L, 16th Illinois Cavalry. The unit served as the body guard for Major General John Alexander McClernand.

Abel was captured in action at Jonesville, Virginia, in January 1964 and was confined in Richmond, Virginia. A month later, he was sent to Andersonville Prison in Georgia. At some point, he was transferred to the POW prison in Salisbury, North Carolina. He escaped from Salisbury on April 13, 1865. He found his way back to Ohio where, on May 4, 1865, he reported at Camp Chase, Ohio. He was mustered out of service in June 1865 at Columbus, Ohio.

After the Civil War, Abel returned to Vermilion Co., Illinois, where he worked in coal mines near Danville for a while. He became Justice of the Peace in Newell Twp., Vermilion Co., Illinois, and he taught school for a few years.

Several years after the Civil War, Abel wrote the poem that is below:

The Roll Call of Heaven

Through four long years of cruel war
We fought for freedom's right,
The sun of chattle slavery
Went down in endless night,
And many thousand soldier boys
They fell but not in vain:
For they called the roll of Heaven
And they answered to their names.

And there's our martyred President,
Honest Abraham;
He died on freedom's altar
For the sacred rights of men.
And never will we see his like
Upon this earth again;
For they called the roll of Heaven
And he answered to his name.

And there's our noble Farragut,
Way down in Mobile bay;
He led his fleets against the forts,
We know he gained the day.
A braver man we will never see
On the quarter-deck again;
For they called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

And there is Meade and Hancock
And old Pap Thomas, too,
Have received their final order
To join the grand review.
And never will Kilpatrick hear
That bugle call again,
For they called the roll of Heaven
And they answered to their names.

And there is George A. Custer, too,
Michigan's favorite son,
He wore the rank of General,
So proudly he had won.
But at the little Big-Horn river,
Upon that battle plain,
They called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

There's fighting Josie Hooker,
His heart is cold and still;
He led the Union army
O're disastrous Chancellorsville.
But above the clouds at Lookout,
He won immortal fame;
But they called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

And there's our noble Garfield,
We'll remember him for years,
For there beside his bedside
Stood a nation bowed in tears.
For eighty days he lingered,
Through all that fearful pain,
Then they called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

And there is Grant, that silent man,
Lies slumbering in the grave.
He did all that any man could do,
Our Union for to save.
But up at Mount McGregor,
Near Saratoga's plain,
They called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

And there is John A. Logan,
Illinois' bravest son,
Who was all crowned o'er with glory
For the victories he had won.
Our brave commander's gone, boys,
We'll n'er see him again,
For they called the roll of Heaven,
And he answered to his name.

And now, my dear old soldier friends,
My song to you is done;
The boys in blue are passing off
Daily one by one.
And when we're camped beneath our flag
upon that judgment plain,
They will call the roll of Heaven,
And we'll answer to our names.
 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  John Payne (1815 - 1863)
  Virletta O'Neal Payne (1819 - 1847)
 
 Spouses:
  Harriet Geneva Bolser Tash (1846 - 1923)
  Elizabeth Ann Oliver Payne (1845 - 1920)*
 
 Children:
  Thomas Louis Payne (1871 - 1947)*
 
 Siblings:
  William O'Neal Payne (1837 - 1888)*
  Alonzo Grimes Payne (1838 - 1905)*
  Abel Wade Payne (1841 - 1923)
  Addison C. Payne (1844 - 1909)*
  Permelia Ann Payne Malcolm (1845 - 1935)*
  George Payne (1847 - 1847)*
  James Buchanan Payne (1857 - 1939)**
  Harriet Payne Barrow (1859 - 1892)**
 
*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling
 
Burial:
Danville National Cemetery
Danville
Vermilion County
Illinois, USA
Plot: Section 11, Site 3241
 
Created by: AMB
Record added: Dec 03, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 31932010
Abel Wade Payne
Added by: AMB
 
Abel Wade Payne
Added by: coan.net
 
Abel Wade Payne
Added by: coan.net
 
 
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Thank you, sir!
- Linda Dorei Jones
 Added: Jun. 28, 2014
You are to be honored for eternity for your participation to abolish slavery.My gg-grandfather was also a prisoner at Andersonville and his life story about the conditions makes ones heart ache for every soldier who was there.
- Rachel Keller
 Added: Jun. 24, 2014
GOD Bless you and all which do and/or the ones which come here to view too !!!
- Jonathan Robert De Mallie
 Added: Jun. 21, 2014
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