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Kiki Cuyler
Original name: Hazen Shirley Cuyler
Birth: Aug. 30, 1899
Death: Feb. 11, 1950

Hall of Fame Major League Baseball Player. Played Major League Baseball as a Outfielder for 18 seasons (1921 to 1938) with the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds and Brooklyn Dodgers. After playing in the very ends of the 1921 through 1923 seasons, he burst into the Pirates lineup in 1924, batting .354 in a spectacular rookie year. The next year he led the National League in Triples (26), and Runs (144), batted .357 and led the Pirates to the NL Pennant and the World Series against the Washington Senators. In the 7 game contest, he would emerge a true World Series hero, batting .269, and making several spectacular catches. He saved his best heroics for the deciding Game 7. With the Series tied up 3 to 3, the Pirates faced "Big Train Walter Johnson. The two teams battled back and forth until the score of the Game was tied 7-7. Facing the great Johnson, Kiki Cuyler stroked an eighth inning two-run double that would put the Pirates ahead for good and clinch the Series (the Pirates would not win another World Series until 1960). The next year he led the NL in Runs (113) and Stole Bases (35). A season-long dispute with Manager Donie Bush got him benched and kept him out the Pirates 1927 World Series appearance against the fabled New York Yankees "Murderer's Row" (who, of course, swept Pittsburgh). The Pirates traded him to the Cubs after the season, and he would continue to be a star with Chicago over the next 7 and a 1/2 seasons, hitting over .300 5 times, and helping them to the 1929 and 1933 World Series. He batted .300 in the Cubs 1929 loss to Connie Mack's Philadelphia A's, and .278 (with a home run) in the 1933 Yankees sweep of Chicago. In 1934 he was named a starting Outfielder on the National League's All-Star team (the second to be held). Midway through the 1935 season he was sent to the Reds, with whom he would have his final .300+ batting year (.326 in 1936). He played his last year as a part-time outfielder with the Dodgers before retiring. He became a coach for the Cubs, then the Red Sox before passing away just prior to the 1950 spring training. His career totals were 1,879 Games Played, 2,299 Hits, 1,305 Runs, 128 Home Runs, 1,065 RBIs, 328 Stolen Bases and a .321 career Batting Average. He hit over .300 10 times (topping at .360 in 1929), led the NL in runs twice, triples once, doubles once and stolen bases 4 times. In 1968 he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee. (bio by: Russ Dodge) 
 
Burial:
Saint Anne Cemetery
Harrisville
Alcona County
Michigan, USA
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Jul 09, 1998
Find A Grave Memorial# 3140
Kiki Cuyler
Added by: Ruggero
 
Kiki Cuyler
Added by: cubsfan@interaccess.com
 
Kiki Cuyler
Added by: cubsfan@interaccess.com
 
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- MosherSt.Munger
 Added: Feb. 11, 2014
It's hard to believe that with your stats it took the veterans' committee of sports writers to finally elect you to the HOF.
- Richard Seibert M.D.
 Added: Jul. 26, 2013
Happy Birthday!
- zinger
 Added: Aug. 30, 2012
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