Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Find all Johnsons in:
 • Loudon Park Cemetery
 • Baltimore
 • Baltimore City
 • Maryland
 • Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Bradley T. Johnson
Birth: Sep. 29, 1829
Death: Oct. 5, 1903

Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. Born in Frederick, Maryland, he was one of the most prominent Marylanders to cast his lot with the Confederacy. An 1849 graduate of The College of New Jersey, he was admitted to the Maryland bar 2 years later. Proving himself to be a very able lawyer, he soon became a state's attorney and chairman of the state Democratic committee. A delegate to the 1860 Democratic presidential nominating conventions at Charleston and Baltimore, he staunchly supported Vice President John C. Breckinridge. When war came, he assisted in recruiting the 1st Maryland, CSA, receiving a commission as its Major. The regiment fought at First Bull Run, subsequently being placed under the command of Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. During Jackson's 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign, he, now commanding the 1st Maryland as Colonel, fought the 1st Maryland, USA, in the streets of Front Royal, on May 23. He led the regiment in the Seven Days' Campaign and at the Battle of Cedar Mountain. During the Second Bull Run Campaign, he temporarily commanded a brigade with such ability that one veteran Southerner claimed no one had ever done it better. His excellent combat record should have secured his promotion to Brigadier General. Jackson on several occasions urged a promotion, but it was not granted until June 28, 1864, when he assumed command of the cavalry brigade of Brigadier General William E. "Grumble" Jones, who had been killed earlier in the month. The unjustified delay probably resulted from lack of a brigade of Maryland units for him to command. He led his brigade in Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early's July 1864 raid on Washington D.C. During this bold operation he attempted to free Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout, Maryland, but the task was too great. On July 30, he and Brigadier General John McCausland executed Early's orders to burn Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in retaliation against the Union Army's destruction of Lexington, Virginia. Returning from Pennsylvania, his and McCausland's brigades were surprised and routed at Moorefield, West Virginia, on August 7. Narrowly escaping in the stampede, he participated in the battles of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864, which destroyed Early's cavalry. When the ravaged mounted units were consolidated, he lost his brigade. He spent the war's final months as commandant of the prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. He settled in Richmond when the war ended, resuming his legal practice and eventually serving in the Virginia state Senate. In 1879 he returned to Baltimore, where he wrote 2 biographies, on George Washington and Joseph E. Johnston, and several articles for Confederate historical publications. He later died at Amelia, Virginia. (bio by: Ugaalltheway) 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Jane Claudia Saunders Johnson (1832 - 1899)*
 
 Children:
  Bradley Saunders Johnson (1856 - 1917)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Loudon Park Cemetery
Baltimore
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Jul 15, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 10999
Bradley T. Johnson
Added by: ronald deavy (Inactive)
 
Bradley T. Johnson
Added by: Burl Kennedy
 
Bradley T. Johnson
Added by: Janet Greentree
 
There are 2 more photos not showing...
Click here to view all images...
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.


- Annie H Darracott 791, UDC - Lakeland, FL
 Added: Oct. 26, 2012
Remembering you today
- Robin Jaggers
 Added: Oct. 5, 2012
HAPPY. BIRTHDAY ..an outstanding Confederate soldier..RIP
- Robin Jaggers
 Added: Sep. 29, 2012
There are 36 more notes not showing...
Click here to view all notes...
How famous was this person?
Current ranking for this person: (3.6 after 19 votes)
 

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service