Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial!
Cornelis Aertsen Vanschaick
Learn about removing the ads from this memorial...
Birth: 1610
Utrecht, Netherlands
Death: 1669
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA

Captain Cornelis Aertsen VanSchaick was the first VanSchaick to settle in the Dutch Colony of New Amsterdam, New Netherlands, which was later to become New York City.

Cornelis was born about 1610 in Westbroek, Province of Utrecht, Netherland.

Among the settlers chosen by the Dutch West India Company was Cornelis Aertsen Van Schaick, a man of 26 who arrived in New Netherland (now New York) in 1636.

In 1636, Cornelis received a grant of landfrom the West India Company.

Among the earliest records of Cornelis in New Amerstdam (New York) are:

1. At New Amsterdam on January 31, 1640 he was joined by three other men in testifying about the good conduct of Huych Aertsen in a local tavern.

2. The next record dates from June 16, 1640, when Cornelis Aertsen from Houten, about 30, and his fiancÚ Belitje Heynricxdr from Arnhem, contracted from Kiliaen Van Rensselaer for four years work in Rensselaerswyck.

3. The next record is the marriage register of the Reformed Church in Sloterdyke outside Amsterdam showing that on July 1, 1640, "Cornelis Aerendtsz van Woerden ende Belitje Hendricx van Arnhem" were married.

These three records tell us much.

Since terms of service were normally for four years, Cornelis had probably been in New Netherland since 1636, the year of his arrival there.

He apparently returned to Amsterdam to marry.

He'd been born between mid 1609 and January 31, 1611, and had been baptized Reformed at Woerden, a town twelve miles west of Utrecht.

Later in buying and selling a house at Manhattan, Cornelis was "from Utrecht", the city from which Hyuck VanRossum came.

Also while Cornelis' signature was ordinarily a handmark, in his contract with Rensselaer he signed "Cornelis Arijaensen", while Belitje signed with an "X".

A tragedy befell Cornelis when he was living at Pavonia (first European settlement on the west bank of the Hudson River). His buildings and property were destroyed in the February 1643 Indian uprising.
After the loss of his house and farm buildings to the Indian torches, Cornelis moved to Manhattan.

In 1645 Cornelis became the grantee of 22 acres of land. This land was located at Crown Point and adjoining the Corlear plantation and had a long frontage on the East River.

In 1656 Cornelis leased Governor Stuyvesant's bouwrie, one of the largest as well as one of the most remote from the city.

Cornelis also became the lessee of the Jan Damen farm, which extended from the East River to the Hudson and was bounded generally on the south by what became known as Wall Street.

On the north it was bounded by Maiden Lane. He was one of the leading farmers of the Colony and is reported to have supplied the families of New Amsterdam with much of their country produce.

Cornelis for many years occupied the "GreatHouse" on the Damen farm located just outside the landgate on what is now Cedar Street. Upon the death of Jan Damen, Cornelis became one of the administrators of the estate.

His father was Aert Jansz Van Schayck.
His mother is unknown.

Cornelis died in 1669 at what is now the southern tip of Manhattan, New York and his estate passed to his surviving children, Arie Cornelissen, Hendrik Cornelissen and their sister Lysbeth Cornelissen.
They conveyed to Captain John Barry of Bergen, NJ two parcels of land on the Island of Manhattan, the two parcels being confirmed by a patent from Governor Francis Lovelace bearing date of 16 September 1669.
 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Belitje Arabella Hendrickse Vanschaick (1624 - 1662)*
 
 Children:
  Arie Cornelissen Vanschaick (1642 - 1699)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Unknown
 
Created by: Michael Duffy
Record added: Jan 15, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 103621360
 

 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service