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Flowers left for Lewis Schwellenbach
Lewis Baxter Schwellenbach: Sir, you will be known as an American lawyer, politician, and judge. As a senator, you led the supporters of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal legislation in the senate. You were an ally of senators Sherman Minton of Indiana, Joe Guffey of Pennsylvania, and Harry S. Truman the future president of the United States of Missouri. The Senate opposition to the new deal was then led by Huey Long of Louisiana, who tried to organize a filibuster campaign against the New Deal. In 1945, you were named as the nation's 5th Secretary of Labor, replacing Frances Perkins, by then-President Harry S. Truman, who wanted a more politically aware secretary. You were a more active secretary than his predecessors. You changed the labor department from a department primarily interested in statistical information gathering to a policy-making department, actively trying to conciliate labor with management and promote a high-wage economy based on unionized labor. The Employment Act of 1946 codified your policy of promoting maximum employment. You also presided over the end of the wage and price controls which had been in effect during World War II. You tried to use your judicial temperament to negotiate agreements. At one point during your term, the nation faced a major crisis large unions in the oil, coal, automobile manufacturing and railroad industries demanded high (30%) wage increases and threatened strikes which could, through secondary effects, cripple the economy. At the end, you and Truman continued to try to get their political allies who headed unions to compromise. The government was finally able to avert a strike when Truman signed orders seizing the railroads in the presence of the union leaders. thanks for everything, may you rest in peace!
- MFPS
 Added: Jun. 10, 2013

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