Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
John "Johnny Appleseed" Chapman
[Add Flowers]
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 480 total)51 - 100 

- martha wyckoff
 Added: Oct. 26, 2014
 

- Liz
 Added: Oct. 18, 2014
 
Not many can even begin to touch your legacy, Mister John. By the grace of God, your bounty o'erspreads our Nation and blesses us all. Rest In Peace
- Soljerblue
 Added: Oct. 5, 2014
 

- MadelineS
 Added: Sep. 27, 2014
 

- DENA ANN
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Remembering ...
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 
John Chapman (September 26, 1774 March 11, 1845), often called Johnny Appleseed, was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts ofPennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present dayWest Virginia. He became an American legend while still alive, due to his kind, generous ways, his leadership in conservation, and the symbolic importance he attributed to apples. He was also a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian) and the inspiration for many museums and historical sites such as the Johnny Appleseed Museum in Urbana, Ohio and the Johnny Appleseed Heritage Center in between Lucas, Ohio and Mifflin, Ohio.John "Johnny Appleseed" Chapman: may Happy 240th Birthday to a man who helped bring apples to America!John Chapman was born in Leominster, Massachusetts, the second child (after his sister, Elizabeth) of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Chapman (ne Simonds, married February 8, 1770) of Massachusetts. His birthplace has a granite marker, and the street is called Johnny Appleseed Lane. Nathaniel Chapman fought at Concord as a Minuteman as early as April 19, 1775 and later served in theContinental Army with General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War.While Nathaniel was in military service, his wife died (July 18, 1776) shortly after giving birth to a second son, named Nathaniel. The baby died about two weeks after his mother. Nathaniel Chapman ended his military service and returned home in 1780 to Longmeadow, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1780 he married Lucy Cooley of Longmeadow, Massachusetts and they had 10 children.According to some accounts, John, at the age of eighteen, persuaded his half-brother Nathaniel, eleven, to go west with him in 1792. The two of them apparently lived a nomadic life until their father, with his large family, came west in 1805 and met up with them in Ohio. Nathaniel the younger then quit moving around with Johnny to help his father farm the land.Shortly after John Chapman and his brother Nathaniel parted ways, he began his apprenticeship as an orchards under a Mr. Crawford, who had apple orchards, thus inspiring his life's journey of planting apple trees. There are stories of Johnny Appleseed practicing his nurseryman craft in the Wilkes-Barre area and of picking seeds from the pomace atPotomac cider mills in the late 1790s. Another story has Chapman living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Grant's Hill in 1794 at the time of the Whiskey Rebellion. Chapman was quick to preach the Gospel as he traveled, and during his travels he converted many Native Americans, whom he admired. The Native Americans regarded him as someone who had been touched by the Great Spirit, and even hostile tribes left him strictly alone. He once wrote, "I have traveled more than 4,000 miles about this country, and I have never met with one single insolent Native American."Johnny Appleseed cared very deeply about animals, including insects. Henry Howe, who visited all the counties in Ohio in the early nineteenth century, collected several stories from the 1830s, when Johnny Appleseed was still alive:One cool autumnal night, while lying by his camp-fire in the woods, he observed that the mosquitoes flew in the blaze and were burned. Johnny, who wore on his head a tin utensil which answered both as a cap and a mush pot, filled it with water and quenched the fire, and afterwards remarked, "God forbid that I should build a fire for my comfort, that should be the means of destroying any of His creatures."Another time he made a camp-fire in a snowstorm at the end of a hollow log in which he intended to pass the night, but finding it occupied by a bear and cubs, he removed his fire to the other end, and slept on the snow in the open air, rather than disturb the bear.When he heard a horse was to be put down, he bought the horse, bought a few grassy acres nearby, and turned the horse out to recover. When it did, he gave the horse to someone needy, exacting a promise to treat the horse humanely. During his later life, he was a vegetarian.There have been different dates listed for his death, but it appears that Harper's New Monthly Magazine of November, 1871 (which is taken by many as the primary source of information about John Chapman) was incorrect in saying he died in the summer of 1847.[11]Multiple Indiana newspapers reported his death having occurred more than two years before that, on March 18, 1845. The Goshen Democrat published a death notice for him in its March 27, 1845 paper citing the day of death as March 18 of that year. In the paper's death notices, it read:"In Fort Wayne, on Tuesday, 18th, inst John Chapman, commonly known by the name of Johnny Appleseed, about 80 years of age. Many of our citizens will remember this eccentric individual, as he sauntered through town eating his dry rust and cold meat, end freely conversing on the mysteries of his religious faith. He was a devoted follower of Emanuel Swedenborg, and notwithstanding his apparent poverty, was reputed to be in good circumstances. The actual site of his grave is disputed as well. Developers of Fort Wayne, Indiana's Canterbury Green apartment complex and golf course claim his grave is there, marked by a rock. That is where the Worth cabin in which he died sat. 416′36″N 857′25″WHowever, Steven Fortriede, director of the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) and author of the 1978 Johnny Appleseed, believes another putative gravesite, located in Johnny Appleseed Park in Fort Wayne, is the correct site. Johnny Appleseed Park is a Fort Wayne, IN city park which adjoins Archer Park, an Allen County park. Archer Park is the site of John Chapman's grave marker and formerly was a part of the family Archer farm.The Worth family attended First Baptist Church in Fort Wayne, according to records at ACPL, which has one of the nation's top genealogy collections. According to an 1858 interview with Richard Worth Jr., Chapman was buried "respectably" in the Archer cemetery, and Fortriede believes use of the term "respectably" indicates Chapman was buried in the hallowed ground of Archer cemetery instead of near the cabin where he died.Johnny Appleseed left an estate of over 1,200 acres (490 ha) of valuable nurseries to his sister. He also owned four plots in Allen County, Indiana, including a nursery in Milan Township, with 15,000 trees. He could have left more if he had been diligent in his bookkeeping. He bought the southwest quarter (160 acres) of section 26, Mohican Township, Ashland County, Ohio, but he did not record the deed and lost the property.The financial panic of 1837 took a toll on his estate. Trees brought only two or three cents each, as opposed to the "fippenny bit" (about six and a quarter cents) that he usually got. Some of his land was sold for taxes following his death, and litigation used up much of the rest.Fort Wayne, Indiana is the location where Johnny Appleseed died. A memorial in Fort Wayne's Swinney Park purports to honor him but not to mark his grave. In Fort Wayne, since 1975, the Johnny Appleseed Festival is held the third full weekend in September in Johnny Appleseed Park and Archer Park. Musicians, demonstrators, and vendors dress in early 19th century attire, and offer food and beverages that would have been available then. In 2008 the Fort Wayne Wizards, a minor league baseball club, changed their name to the Fort Wayne TinCaps. The first season with the new name was in 2009. That same year the Tincaps won their only league championship. The name "Tincaps" is a reference to the tin hat (or pot) Johnny Appleseed is said to have worn. Their team mascot is also named "Johnny".From 1962 to 1980, a high school athletic league made up of schools from around the Mansfield, Ohio, area was named the Johnny Appleseed Conference.In 1966, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 5 cent stamp commemorating Johnny Appleseed.A memorial in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, OH is located on the summit of the grounds in Section 134. A circular garden surrounds a large stone upon which a bronze statue of Chapman stands, face looking skywards, holding an apple seedling tree in one hand and book in the other. A bronze cenotaph identifies him as Johnny Appleseed with a brief biography and eulogy.March 11 or September 26 are sometimes celebrated as Johnny Appleseed Day. The September date is Appleseed's acknowledged birthdate, but the March date is sometimes preferred because it is during planting season.Johnny Appleseed Elementary School is a public school located in Leominster, MA, his birthplace. Mansfield, Ohio, one of Appleseed's stops in his peregrinations, was home to Johnny Appleseed Middle School until it closed in 1989.The village of Lisbon, Ohio, hosts an annual Johnny Appleseed festival September 1819.A large terracotta sculpture of Johnny Appleseed, created by Viktor Schreckengost, decorates the front of the Lakewood High School Civic Auditorium in Lakewood, Ohio. Although the local Board of Education deemed Appleseed too "eccentric" a figure to grace the front of the building, renaming the sculpture simply "Early Settler," students, teachers, and parents alike still call the sculpture by its intended name: "Johnny Appleseed."Urbana University, located in Urbana, OH, maintains the world's only Johnny Appleseed Museum, which is open to the public. The museum hosts a number of artifacts, including a tree that is believed to have been planted by Johnny Appleseed. In addition, the museum is also home to a large number of historical memorabilia, the largest in the world. They also provide a number of services for research, including a national registry of Johnny Appleseed's relatives. In 2011 the museum was renovated and updated and is now able to hold more memorabilia in a modern museum setting
- MFPS
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Palm Springs Girl
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- mj
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Gil
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- sjm
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Johnny
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Janis Coleman
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Mike Caldwell
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 
Happy Birthday
- Sunshine
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- elaine bailey
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Cheryll Cotten
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 
Happy Birthday
- Cindy
 Added: Sep. 26, 2014
 

- Dorothy
 Added: Sep. 25, 2014
 
We love you a bushel & a peck. Thank you, "Johnny Appleseed' Chapman.
-Anonymous
 Added: Sep. 16, 2014
 
a Real Hero.
- June
 Added: Sep. 8, 2014
 

- Mary Beth
 Added: Aug. 26, 2014
 
Rest In Peace, Dear Johnny!
- Eman Bonnici
 Added: Aug. 8, 2014
 

- Sonja
 Added: Aug. 3, 2014
 
As a pre-school teacher, I have shared the story of your life with many children. Your love for God, people, animals and nature is so inspiring. You are truly never forgotten. May you rest in peace.
 Added: Jul. 11, 2014
 

- Star Kline
 Added: Jul. 1, 2014
 

- Donna B.
 Added: Jun. 30, 2014
 
In memory of my 2nd cousin six times removed
- BeNotForgot
 Added: May. 9, 2014
 

- Remember the beyond
 Added: Mar. 31, 2014
 

- bob tarte
 Added: Mar. 18, 2014
 

- MFPS
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- R I P
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- RacTx
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

-Anonymous
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Janis Coleman
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Scotvik
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- czgrammy
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Pipedreamer
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Dorothy
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- TheMysterian
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Cindy
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- ke Frisk
 Added: Mar. 10, 2014
 

- Angeline
 Added: Mar. 9, 2014
 

- Carla
 Added: Mar. 9, 2014
 
Thank you for the foresight, that we may enjoy the efforts of your labor. What a gift.
- Geraldine Barnett
 Added: Jan. 4, 2014
 

- CMueller
 Added: Dec. 13, 2013
 
In Honor of You Sir, Rest With God
- Cherry Reynolds Solly
 Added: Dec. 3, 2013
 

- Barbara Grimes
 Added: Nov. 1, 2013
 
May GOD Bless You John Chapmman! Planting any fruit tree is a wonderful event..::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::It is on Major General Benjamin Butler's in Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, the monument reads."the true touchstone of civil liberty is not that all men are equal but that every man has the right to be the equal of every other man - if he can."**********"They that love beyond the world cannot be separated by it. Death cannot kill what never dies" . ~William Penn~
- Jonathan Robert De Mallie
 Added: Oct. 2, 2013
 

- MFPS
 Added: Sep. 26, 2013
 
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 480 total)51 - 100 
 

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service