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Stephen Fuller Austin
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Flowers 1 to 50 (of 259 total)51 - 100 

- Karan Callaway
 Added: Apr. 7, 2014
 

- bob tarte
 Added: Jan. 8, 2014
 
Stephen Fuller Austin: He was an American empresario born inVirginia and raised in southeastern Missouri. He was known as the Father of Texas, led the second, but first legal and ultimately successful colonization of the region by bringing 300 families from the United States. The capital of Texas, Austin in Travis County, Austin County, Austin Bayou, Stephen F. Austin State University inNacogdoches, Austin College in Sherman, and a number of K-12 schools are named in his honor. Austin boarded the steamer Beaver and departed to New Orleans to meet Spanish officials led byErasmo Seguín. He was at Natchitoches, Louisiana, on June 31, 1821, when he learned of his father's death. "This news has effected me very much, he was one of the most feeling and affectionate Fathers that ever lived. His faults I now say, and always have, were not of the heart." His party traveled the 300 miles (480 km) in three weeks to San Antonio with the intent of reauthorizing his father's grant, arriving on August 12. While in transit, they learned Mexico had declared its independence from Spain, and Texas had become a Mexican province rather than a Spanish territory. A San Antonio native, José Antonio Navarro, having like visions of the future of Texas, befriended Stephen F. Austin, and a lasting association developed between the two. Navarro, proficient with Spanish and Mexican law, would assist Austin in obtaining his empresario contracts. In San Antonio, the grant was reauthorized by GovernorAntonio María Martínez, who allowed Austin to explore the Gulf Coast between San Antonio and the Brazos River to find a suitable location for a colony.As guides for the party, Manuel Becerra, along with three Aranama Indians, went with the expedition. Austin advertised the opportunity in New Orleans, stating that the land was available along the Brazos and Colorado Rivers A family of a husband, wife and two children would receive 1,280 acres (520 ha) at twelve and a half cents per acre. Farmers could get 177 acres (72 ha) and ranchers 4,428 acres (1,792 ha). In December 1821, the first U.S. colonists crossed into the granted territory by land and sea, on the Brazos River in present-day Brazoria County, Texas. Austin's plan for a colony was thrown into turmoil by the independence of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Governor Martínez informed Austin that the junta instituyente, the new rump congress of the government ofAgustín de Iturbide of Mexico, refused to recognize the land grant authorized by Spain, based on a new policy of using a general immigration law to regulate new settlement in Mexico. Austin traveled to Mexico City and managed to persuade and approve the grant to his father, as well as the law signed by the Mexican Emperor on January 3, 1823. The old imperial law offered heads of families a league and a labor of land, 4,605 acres (1,864 ha), and other inducements. It also provided for the employment of agents,called empresario, Austin himself was to receive 67,000 acres of land for each 200 families he introduced. According to the law, immigrants were not required to pay fees to the government. This fact soon led some of the immigrants to deny Austin's right to charge them for services at the rate of 12.5 cents/acre (31 cents/ha). The Republic of Texas, created by a new constitution on March 2, 1836, won independence following a string of defeats with the dramatic turnabout victory at theBattle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, and the capture of Santa Anna the following morning. He was then imprisoned. In December 1835, Austin, Branch Archer, and William H. Wharton were appointed commissioners to the U.S. by the provisional government of the republic. On June 10, 1836, Austin was in New Orleans, where he received word of Santa Anna's defeat by Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto. Austin returned to Texas to rest at Peach Point in August. On August 4, he announced his candidacy for president of Texas. Austin felt confident he could win the election until two weeks before the election, when on August 20, Houston entered the race. Austin wrote, "Many of the old settlers who are too blind to see or understand their interest will vote for him." Houston carried East Texas, the Red River region, and most of the soldiers' votes. Austin received 587 votes to Sam Houston's 5,119 and Henry Smith's 743 votes. Houston would appoint Austin as the first secretary of state of the new republic; however, Austin served only around two months before his tragic death. In December 1836, Austin was in the new capital of Columbia (now known as West Columbia) where he caught a severe cold; his condition worsened. Doctors were called in, but could not help him. Austin died of pneumonia at noon on December 27, 1836, at the home of George B. McKinstry right outside of what is now West Columbia, Texas. Austin's last words were "The independence of Texas is recognized! Don't you see it in the papers?..." Upon hearing of Austin's death, Houston ordered an official statement proclaiming: "The Father of Texas is no more; the first pioneer of the wilderness has departed." Austin was originally buried at Gulf Prairie Cemetery in Brazoria County, Texas. Austin's body was moved, however, in 1910 to theTexas State Cemetery in Austin, Texas. Austin died without having produced offspring, and bequeathed all his land, titles, and possessions, to his sister, Emily Austin Perry. The National Statuary Hall Collection permits each state to select just two statues for display at the Capital in Washington, DC. Texas selected Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin; these statues were sculpted by German immigrant Elisabet Ney. Stephen Austin: You are truly a heroic figure in American History, thanks for being a heroic figure and the founder of the state of Texas,may you rest in peace!
- MFPS
 Added: Dec. 27, 2013
 
With honor and respect. ★☆★
- sniksnak
 Added: Dec. 27, 2013
 

- Rosita
 Added: Dec. 27, 2013
 

- DENA ANN
 Added: Dec. 27, 2013
 

- Alan Brownsten
 Added: Dec. 27, 2013
 

- TheMysterian
 Added: Dec. 26, 2013
 

- Amy the Spirit Seeker
 Added: Dec. 5, 2013
 

- Amy the Spirit Seeker
 Added: Dec. 5, 2013
 

- DSmith
 Added: Nov. 4, 2013
 

- DENA ANN
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 
Stephen Fuller Austin: He was an American empresario born inVirginia and raised in southeastern Missouri. He was known as the Father of Texas, led the second, but first legal and ultimately successful colonization of the region by bringing 300 families from the United States. The capital of Texas, Austin in Travis County, Austin County, Austin Bayou, Stephen F. Austin State University inNacogdoches, Austin College in Sherman, and a number of K-12 schools are named in his honor. Austin boarded the steamer Beaver and departed to New Orleans to meet Spanish officials led byErasmo Seguín. He was at Natchitoches, Louisiana, on June 31, 1821, when he learned of his father's death. "This news has effected me very much, he was one of the most feeling and affectionate Fathers that ever lived. His faults I now say, and always have, were not of the heart." His party traveled the 300 miles (480 km) in three weeks to San Antonio with the intent of reauthorizing his father's grant, arriving on August 12. While in transit, they learned Mexico had declared its independence from Spain, and Texas had become a Mexican province rather than a Spanish territory. A San Antonio native, José Antonio Navarro, having like visions of the future of Texas, befriended Stephen F. Austin, and a lasting association developed between the two. Navarro, proficient with Spanish and Mexican law, would assist Austin in obtaining his empresario contracts. In San Antonio, the grant was reauthorized by GovernorAntonio María Martínez, who allowed Austin to explore the Gulf Coast between San Antonio and the Brazos River to find a suitable location for a colony.As guides for the party, Manuel Becerra, along with three Aranama Indians, went with the expedition. Austin advertised the opportunity in New Orleans, stating that the land was available along the Brazos and Colorado Rivers A family of a husband, wife and two children would receive 1,280 acres (520 ha) at twelve and a half cents per acre. Farmers could get 177 acres (72 ha) and ranchers 4,428 acres (1,792 ha). In December 1821, the first U.S. colonists crossed into the granted territory by land and sea, on the Brazos River in present-day Brazoria County, Texas. Austin's plan for a colony was thrown into turmoil by the independence of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Governor Martínez informed Austin that the junta instituyente, the new rump congress of the government ofAgustín de Iturbide of Mexico, refused to recognize the land grant authorized by Spain, based on a new policy of using a general immigration law to regulate new settlement in Mexico. Austin traveled to Mexico City and managed to persuade and approve the grant to his father, as well as the law signed by the Mexican Emperor on January 3, 1823. The old imperial law offered heads of families a league and a labor of land, 4,605 acres (1,864 ha), and other inducements. It also provided for the employment of agents,called empresario, Austin himself was to receive 67,000 acres of land for each 200 families he introduced. According to the law, immigrants were not required to pay fees to the government. This fact soon led some of the immigrants to deny Austin's right to charge them for services at the rate of 12.5 cents/acre (31 cents/ha). The Republic of Texas, created by a new constitution on March 2, 1836, won independence following a string of defeats with the dramatic turnabout victory at theBattle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, and the capture of Santa Anna the following morning. He was then imprisoned. In December 1835, Austin, Branch Archer, and William H. Wharton were appointed commissioners to the U.S. by the provisional government of the republic. On June 10, 1836, Austin was in New Orleans, where he received word of Santa Anna's defeat by Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto. Austin returned to Texas to rest at Peach Point in August. On August 4, he announced his candidacy for president of Texas. Austin felt confident he could win the election until two weeks before the election, when on August 20, Houston entered the race. Austin wrote, "Many of the old settlers who are too blind to see or understand their interest will vote for him." Houston carried East Texas, the Red River region, and most of the soldiers' votes. Austin received 587 votes to Sam Houston's 5,119 and Henry Smith's 743 votes. Houston would appoint Austin as the first secretary of state of the new republic; however, Austin served only around two months before his tragic death. In December 1836, Austin was in the new capital of Columbia (now known as West Columbia) where he caught a severe cold; his condition worsened. Doctors were called in, but could not help him. Austin died of pneumonia at noon on December 27, 1836, at the home of George B. McKinstry right outside of what is now West Columbia, Texas. Austin's last words were "The independence of Texas is recognized! Don't you see it in the papers?..." Upon hearing of Austin's death, Houston ordered an official statement proclaiming: "The Father of Texas is no more; the first pioneer of the wilderness has departed." Austin was originally buried at Gulf Prairie Cemetery in Brazoria County, Texas. Austin's body was moved, however, in 1910 to theTexas State Cemetery in Austin, Texas. Austin died without having produced offspring, and bequeathed all his land, titles, and possessions, to his sister, Emily Austin Perry. The National Statuary Hall Collection permits each state to select just two statues for display at the Capital in Washington, DC. Texas selected Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin; these statues were sculpted by German immigrant Elisabet Ney. Stephen Austin: You are truly a heroic figure in American History, thanks for being a heroic figure and the founder of the state of Texas, happy 220th birthday!
- MFPS
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 

- Kaye Miller
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 

- Kathy (McPhaul) Cather
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 

- Tracey Reid
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 

- Cindy
 Added: Nov. 3, 2013
 
He brought my ancestors to Texas in 1821. RIP
- 8thGenerationTexan
 Added: Oct. 27, 2013
 

- Rosita
 Added: Oct. 2, 2013
 

-Anonymous
 Added: Sep. 24, 2013
 
R.I.P to my 2nd cousin 5x removed.
- Stacy AF
 Added: Sep. 8, 2013
 

- melinda
 Added: Aug. 13, 2013
 

- Gail McKinzie Clark
 Added: Aug. 4, 2013
 

- bob tarte
 Added: Jun. 16, 2013
 

- Imagraver
 Added: Mar. 1, 2013
 
Stephen,All these years growing up, I thought you were my uncle, but after painstaking research, your father is my uncle, so hi cousin!My grandmother was Alverta Delia Austin.will keep up our family good name
- SUNNI KUBISHTA
 Added: Jan. 5, 2013
 

- bestill
 Added: Jan. 1, 2013
 

- sniksnak
 Added: Dec. 28, 2012
 
Stephen Austin: You are truly a heroic figure in American History, thanks for being a heroic figure and the founder of the state of Texas, may you rest in peace!
- MFPS
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 
Better is the end of a thing than it's beginning; better is a patient spirit than a proud spirit. Ecc 7
- David Martin
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 

- Rose Chandler Royals
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 

- James Snow
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 

- Alan Brownsten
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 

- Lucy Caldarelli
 Added: Dec. 27, 2012
 

- Betty Warner
 Added: Dec. 11, 2012
 
Thank you.
- GoneToTexas
 Added: Dec. 10, 2012
 

- Gail McKinzie Clark
 Added: Nov. 29, 2012
 
RIP
- Mary Harper
 Added: Nov. 20, 2012
 
Happy 219th Birthday! With love,
- Michelle Herbelin
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 

- WGTLC Scully Tolman
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 
Stephen Austin: You are truly a heroic figure in American History, thanks for being a heroic figure and the founder of the state of Texas, happy birthday!
- MFPS
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 

- Kaye Miller
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 
Birthday Blessings!
- Kathy (McPhaul) Cather
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 
Birthday Blessings to a Tx Hero.Thank you.
- Rose Chandler Royals
 Added: Nov. 3, 2012
 
Thank you
- WGTLC Scully Tolman
 Added: Oct. 23, 2012
 

- R. T. Brandon
 Added: Oct. 10, 2012
 

- D McK S
 Added: Sep. 14, 2012
 

-Anonymous
 Added: Aug. 25, 2012
 

- Betty Warner
 Added: Jul. 30, 2012
 
Thank you for serving the people of Texas. We are blessed because you lived.
- Victoria
 Added: Jul. 20, 2012
 
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 259 total)51 - 100 
 

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