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Isaac Newton Brown
[Add Flowers]
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 56 total)51 - 56 
Forever in the hearts of those who remember your service during the War for Southern Independence.
- NWO
 Added: Feb. 1, 2016
 

- Cori H
 Added: Sep. 21, 2014
 

- Angel
 Added: Apr. 24, 2014
 

- bob tarte
 Added: Feb. 4, 2014
 
Isaac N. Brown was born in Caldwell County, Kentucky, but spent part of his later youth in western Tennessee. In March 1834, shortly after his father died, he joined the United States Navy as a midshipman. He received a commission as a lieutenant in 1846 and later participated in the Mexican-American War. He married, owned property on the Mississippi Delta, and had three sons. He remained in the Navy and made several trips around the world on various ships.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
The Mexican–American War, also known as the Mexican War, the U.S.–Mexican War, the Invasion of Mexico, the U.S. Intervention, or the United States War Against Mexico, was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848 in the wake of the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered part of its territory despite the 1836 Texas Revolution. Combat operations lasted a year and a half, from spring 1846 to fall 1847. American forces quickly occupied New Mexico and California, then invaded parts of Northeastern Mexico and Northwest Mexico; meanwhile, the Pacific Squadron conducted a blockade, and took control of several garrisons on the Pacific coast further south in Baja California. Another American army captured Mexico City, and the war ended in victory for the U.S. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo specified the major consequence of the war: the forced Mexican Cession of the territories of Alta California and New Mexico to the U.S. in exchange for $15 million. In addition, the United States assumed $3.25 million of debt owed by the Mexican government to U.S. citizens. Mexico accepted the loss of Texas and thereafter cited the Rio Grande as its national border. American territorial expansion to the Pacific coast had been the goal of President James K. Polk, the leader of the Democratic Party.[5] However, the war was highly controversial in the U.S., with the Whig Party, anti-imperialists and anti-slavery elements strongly opposed. Heavy American casualties and high monetary cost were also criticized. The political aftermath of the war raised the slavery issue in the U.S., leading to intense debates that pointed to civil war; the Compromise of 1850 provided a brief respite. In Mexico, terminology for the war includes primera intervención estadounidense en México (United States' First Intervention in Mexico), invasión estadounidense a México (United States' Invasion of Mexico), and guerra del 47 (The War of 1847).
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
The National Association of Mexican War Veterans (NAVMW) originated in post-Civil War California and expanded into a national group in January 1874 thanks to the advocacy of former dragoon Alexander M. Kenaday. The primary mission was to press Congress for pension benefits, recognition, and a stipend that aging Mexican War veterans had never received from the Federal government. In 1876, NAVMW finalized a complex design and issued a tier of gold, silver, and bronze shield-shaped medals to its members for purchase. Couched in Reconstruction era politics, a reluctant Congress ultimately delivered a pension to Mexican War veteran-applicants, but the organization‘s lofty goals including battlefield preservation and permanent recognition were never really achieved, overshadowed by the monolithic GAR movement. The last NAVMW meeting occurred in Indianapolis in 1910 and it is thought that the last Mexican War veteran died in 1929. Andrew W. Johnson had an extensive navy career including Civil War service. From the District of Columbia, he joined the navy as Midshipman in October 1841, passed Midshipman, August 1847, serving in the Pacific Squadron aboard the sloop Warren and the store ship Erie.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
The Southern Cross of Honor is the name of two separate and distinct military honors presented to Confederate military personnel and veterans. The original wartime medal, aka Confederate Medal of Honor, was a military decoration meant to honor officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates for their valor in the armed forces of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. It was formally approved by the Congress of the Confederate States on October 13, 1862, and was originally intended to be on par with the Union Army's Medal of Honor. During the war, however, there were shortages of metals, and many medals were not minted or awarded. The names of these soldiers were, however, recorded in an Honor Roll and preserved in the Adjutant Inspector General's records. The postwar version of the medal, which is a separate award than the original wartime medal, came into being following a reunion in 1898. The idea of bestowing the Southern Cross of Honor to Confederate veterans of the American Civil War was conceived in Atlanta in July 1898 by Mrs. Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, GA, at a reunion of Confederate veterans. Mrs. Erwin and Mrs. Sarah E. Gabbett of Atlanta are credited with the design of the medal. The medal was at this point authorized by the UDC to be awarded to any Confederate Veteran who had provided "loyal, honorable service to the South and given in recognition of this devotion." A metal cross pattée with the representation of a Confederate battle flag placed on the center thereof surrounded by a wreath, with the inscription "The Southern Cross of Honor." On the back of the medal is the motto of the Confederate States of America, "Deo Vindice" ([With] God [As Our] Vindicator), the dates 1861 1865, and the inscription, "From the UDC to the UCV." (UDC stands for the United Daughters of the Confederacy; UCV stands for the United Confederate Veterans.) The Southern Cross of Honor could only be bestowed through the United Daughters of the Confederacy. It could not be purchased; it was given in recognition of loyal, honorable service to the South and only a Confederate veteran could wear it. The first Cross ever bestowed was upon Mrs. Erwin's husband, Captain Alexander S. Erwin, by the Athens (Ga.) Chapter on April 26, 1900. Although no Civil War veterans are still living, the last verified Confederate veteran dying in 1951, Virginia Code section 18.2-176(b) remains in effect and makes it a Class 3 misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not more than $500, to "wear any Southern Cross of Honor when not entitled to do so by the regulations under which such Crosses of Honor are given."
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
Shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861, he resigned his commission. In June, he accepted a commission as a lieutenant in the fledgling Confederate States Navy. Brown was assigned to the Mississippi River region by the Confederate Naval Department. In May 1862 he was ordered to Yazoo City, Mississippi, to take command of the unfinished ironclad CSS Arkansas and complete her construction in the worst of conditions. After successfully accomplishing this difficult task, Brown commanded her dramatic breaking of the Federal naval blockade of Vicksburg, Mississippi, on July 15, 1862. Brown was promoted to commander in August 1862 in recognition of his bold and audacious actions at Vicksburg. Commander Brown served as captain of the ironclad CSS Charleston, which operated in defense of Charleston, South Carolina, during 1863–1865.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
The Southern Cross of Honor is the name of two separate and distinct military honors presented to Confederate military personnel and veterans. The original wartime medal, aka Confederate Medal of Honor, was a military decoration meant to honor officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates for their valor in the armed forces of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. It was formally approved by the Congress of the Confederate States on October 13, 1862, and was originally intended to be on par with the Union Army's Medal of Honor. During the war, however, there were shortages of metals, and many medals were not minted or awarded. The names of these soldiers were, however, recorded in an Honor Roll and preserved in the Adjutant Inspector General's records. The postwar version of the medal, which is a separate award than the original wartime medal, came into being following a reunion in 1898. The idea of bestowing the Southern Cross of Honor to Confederate veterans of the American Civil War was conceived in Atlanta in July 1898 by Mrs. Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, GA, at a reunion of Confederate veterans. Mrs. Erwin and Mrs. Sarah E. Gabbett of Atlanta are credited with the design of the medal. The medal was at this point authorized by the UDC to be awarded to any Confederate Veteran who had provided "loyal, honorable service to the South and given in recognition of this devotion." The design for the face of the medal consists of a Maltese cross with a Confederate battle flag surrounded with a laurel wreath, with the inscription "The Southern Cross of Honor." On the back of the medal is the motto of the Confederate States of America, "Deo Vindice" ([With] God [As Our] Vindicator), and the dates 1861 1865.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Jul. 5, 2013
 
God bless you today and always. Rest in Peace.
- Thelma
 Added: May. 27, 2013
 

- Annie H Darracott 791, UDC - Lakeland, FL
 Added: Apr. 4, 2013
 

- Diddy & Doodle
 Added: Aug. 5, 2012
 

- Rubbings
 Added: Jul. 16, 2012
 

- timcdfw
 Added: Jul. 7, 2012
 
A Christmas Tree For My Hero. May God Bless You For All You Did For All Of Us.
- Pat Gafford Bunch
 Added: Dec. 8, 2011
 

- Virginia Lee Young
 Added: Nov. 1, 2011
 
You did your duty as you saw fit. You were a great Captain who took the CSS Arkansas on a historic combat mission.
- Mike Lentz
 Added: May. 30, 2011
 

- lisa greenman
 Added: Sep. 1, 2010
 
Honoring your service to the Confederacy and your place in American history
- Kathy Bergold
 Added: Aug. 27, 2010
 
No More Yankees, No More Rebels...Just Fellow Americans.
- LaDene
 Added: Aug. 26, 2010
 

- Satoris LeFier
 Added: Jan. 19, 2010
 
Remembering and Honoring a True Southern Hero. A Confederate Sailor. Deo Vindice.
- Tony Smith SCV Camp 38, North Charleston S.C.
 Added: Jan. 14, 2010
 
God Bless
- Floyd Sims
 Added: Nov. 30, 2009
 
Deo Vindice
- Roger Anderson
 Added: Nov. 22, 2009
 
You will always be remembered. You are my Hero. May God Bless You.Thank You Sir.
- Pat Gafford Bunch
 Added: Nov. 7, 2009
 

- shelby
 Added: Sep. 1, 2009
 

- James J. Stalcup
 Added: Sep. 1, 2009
 

- LaDene
 Added: Sep. 1, 2009
 
~ We remember, Sir, and we thank you! ~
- jaybee
 Added: Jul. 10, 2009
 

- purple-lady
 Added: May. 27, 2009
 
Remembrance of your honor is our strength.Deo Vindice
- J. Barry Turnage
 Added: May. 11, 2009
 
You are my Hero.
- Pat Gafford Bunch
 Added: Oct. 25, 2008
 
Fair Winds and Following Seas, Sir.
- Bob Hufford
 Added: May. 27, 2008
 

- TEXAS TUDORS
 Added: Feb. 20, 2008
 

- Janice Williams Langley
 Added: Jul. 1, 2007
 
May you rest in heavenly peace.
-Anonymous
 Added: May. 27, 2007
 

- Hope Thurman
 Added: Nov. 15, 2006
 
In memory.
-Anonymous
 Added: May. 27, 2006
 
Brown received the Confederate Medal of Honor for his service.


- Tom Denardo
 Added: Mar. 27, 2006
 
REPOSE EN PAIX!
- quebecoise
 Added: Nov. 28, 2005
 
Know that you are remembered on your birthday. Rest in Peace.
- Doc
 Added: May. 27, 2005
 

- A Marine's Daughter
 Added: May. 27, 2005
 
Here's to a Happy Birthday to you, Sir, from a proud Charlestonian.

God bless and rest in Heavenly peace always ~ you are not forgotten!
- Just another taphophile
 Added: May. 27, 2005
 
Commander, CSS Arkansas
July 15, 1862 - Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers
Posthumously awarded the Confederate Medal Of Honor
May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You, Rest In Eternal Peace

- Allen
 Added: Jun. 3, 2004
 

- Wes
 Added: May. 3, 2004
 
God bless you for your devotion to the cause. Deo vindice.
- Kelley G
 Added: Apr. 6, 2004
 

- Christine Addis
 Added: Jul. 23, 2003
 

- quebecoise
 Added: Mar. 20, 2003
 
Rest In Peace.
- ronald deavy
 Added: Jun. 11, 2002
 
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 56 total)51 - 56 
 

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